A Guide to QuarkXPress 2018

Document construction

The Layers feature lets you easily hide, show, and suppress the printing of groups of objects. The Lists feature lets you create tables of contents and other lists. The Index feature lets you automatically generate an index of a layout. The Libraries feature lets you keep often-used elements in an easy-to-reach place.

Using automatic page numbering

To insert an automatic page number on every page:

  1. Display a master page by choosing its name from the Display submenu (Page > Display), or by clicking on the icon at the lower left hand corner of the document window.

  2. Create a text box where you want a page number to appear.

  3. Press Command+3/Ctrl+3. This enters the Current Page Number character <#>. Layout pages based on that master page will display the current page number in the location where you place the Current Page Number character.

  4. Select the Current Page Number character <#> and specify the desired character attributes.

Creating an automatic text box

An automatic text box lets you automatically flow text from page to page. To create an automatic text box:

  1. Display a master page by choosing its name from the Display submenu (Page > Display).

  2. Create a text box where you want the automatic text box to appear.

  3. Select the Linking tool .

  4. Click the Auto Text Box Linking icon in the upper left hand corner of the page.

  5. Click the box you created in step 2.

All pages based on this master page will contain an automatic text box. Text inserted into this box will automatically flow from page to page.

Working with master pages

Master pages are like templates for pages. If you want to use the same heading, footing, background, page number positioning, and so forth on some of your pages, you can create these things on a master page, and then just apply that master page to the layout pages that need it. If you want to use a different set of page content on either side of a spread, you can do that too. A single layout can have multiple master pages, so that you can automatically format different parts of the same layout.

The topics below describe master pages in more detail.

Creating a master page

The best way to explain master pages is by example. In this example, we will create a facing-page master page with an automatic text box, automatic page numbers in the footer, and wide inside margins. To create such a master page:

  1. Create a new facing-page layout with an automatic text box.

  2. Choose Window > Page Layout. The Page Layout palette displays.

    Page Layout palette

    Note that there is already a default master page named A-Master A. You can tell that this master page has been applied to the first page because of the A that displays on the page icon in the bottom part of the palette.

  3. You can create single-page master pages by dragging the Blank Single Page icon into the master page area at the top of the palette. In facing-page documents, you can also create facing-page master pages by dragging the Blank Facing Page icon into the master page area. Drag Blank Facing Page . A new facing-page master page named B-Master B displays in the palette.

    Page Layout palette with new master page
  4. To display the new master page for editing, double-click the B-Master B icon. The master page displays in the main window. Note that because this is a facing-page master page, it includes two pages: The left page and the right page. Also, note the broken-link icons in the upper left.

    Blank facing-page master page
  5. To add page numbers, draw two boxes on the lower left and right, as shown below. In each of these boxes, click with the Text Content tool and then choose Utilities > Insert Character > Special > Current Box Page #. This inserts a character that will display as the current page number in layout pages. Format and justify the character any way you like. (Of course, you can put your page numbers anywhere you want to.)

    Page number characters on either side of a facing-page master page
  6. To indicate where the text should go, draw some guides and then draw two text boxes like those shown below.

    Master page with guides and text boxes
  7. Now you must link the text boxes to the automatic text chain. With the Text Linking tool selected, click the broken-link icon at the top of the left page, then the text box on the left page. Then click on a blank part of the page. Finally, click the broken-link icon at the top of the right page, and then the text box on the right page. The text boxes on these two master pages are now linked to the automatic text chain.

  8. Double-click the master page's name in the Page Layout palette and change it from "B-Master B" to "B-Body Spread."

  9. Choose Page > Display > Layout. The view switches back to the layout pages.

  10. Click in the text box on page 1 with the Text Content tool .

  11. To add two new pages that use the new master page, choose Page > Insert. The Insert Pages dialog box displays.

    Insert Pages dialog box

    You can also add pages by pressing Option/Alt and then dragging a master page to the desired location in the bottom part of the Page Layout dialog box.

  12. Enter 4 in the page(s) field, click after page, and choose B-Body Spread from the Master Page drop-down menu. After you choose the master page, check Link to Current Text Chain, then click OK. Four new pages are added to the layout, and both of them have the text boxes and page numbers you created on the master page.

    To verify that the new master pages have been linked to the master text chain, click in any of the main text boxes with the Text Content tool and then choose Utilities > Insert Placeholder Text. The entire text chain fills with text.

    Master pages filled with Placeholder Text.
  13. To add sections, choose Page > Section. The Section dialog box displays.

    Section dialog box

    If you specify a section name (optional), you may use that name to specify the pages that will be used for creating a table of contents in HTML5 Publications and iOS Apps. Refer to A Guide to Digital Publishing with QuarkXPress for more details.

Applying master pages

There are two ways to apply a master page to a layout page.

  • Drag the master page from the top part of the Page Layout palette (Windows menu) to the target page in the bottom part of the palette.

  • Select the target page or pages in the bottom part of the Page Layout palette, then press Option/Alt and click the desired master page in the top part of the palette.

Updating master pages

When you make a change to a master page, that change is automatically made to any layout pages that use that master page. In other words, if you move the page number box on a master page, the page number box will be automatically repositioned on every page that uses that master page.

If you make a change to a master page item on a layout page, then reapply the master page, one of two things can happen:

  • If Master Page Items is set to Keep Changes (QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Print Layout > General pane), the changed item is left where it is but is no longer linked with the master page, and a copy of the item from the master page is added.

  • If Master Page Items is set to Delete Changes (QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Print Layout > General pane), the changed item is deleted and replaced with a copy of the item from the master page.

Master pages and layout families

Master pages work a little bit differently with layout families than they do with layouts that are not part of a layout family. (For more information about layout families, see "Understanding layout families" in A Guide to App Studio.)

  • If you add, delete, or rename a master page in a layout family, the master page is added, deleted, or renamed in all of the layouts in that layout family.

  • If you add pages to one of a layout family's layouts with a particular master page, pages with that same master page are added to the other layouts in the layout family.

  • If you apply a master page to a layout page in one of a layout family's layouts, that master page is not applied to the corresponding pages in the layout family's other layouts. This allows you to use different master pages for the vertical and horizontal versions of a page in a layout family.

  • If you make a change to a given master page in one of a layout family's layouts, that change is not reflected in the same-named master pages in the other layouts. This allows you to customize master pages for each of a layout family's page designs.

Working with layers

The Layers palette is the "control center" for layers. You can hide, show, lock, or unlock layers with a single click in this palette. You also can use this palette to specify the active layer (where newly drawn objects will go), to rearrange the stacking order of layers, to merge layers, and to move objects from one layer to another.

Each layer you create has a unique color swatch in the Layers palette. When you create an item on a layer, the item's bounding box and handles use that layer's color.

To display the Layers palette, choose View > Layers.

You can work with layers in the Layers palette.

Every layout has a Default layer. You can add and remove items from the Default layer, but you cannot delete the Default layer.

A layout can contain up to 256 layers, including the Default layer.

Understanding layers

A QuarkXPress layer is like a clear overlay that covers every page in a layout. You can put almost anything on a layer, including picture boxes, text boxes, lines, tables, interactive objects, and any other kind of QuarkXPress item.

Layers can be useful in many different ways:

  • You can put all pictures on a one layer and all text on another layer, allowing you to work more easily with boxes should they overlap.

  • You can put different translations of a document on different layers, and thus store all language versions of the document in the same layout. When you print the layout, you can hide all of the layers except the one that contains the language you want.

  • You can put different versions of a design on different layers, so that you can easily switch back and forth among variations on the design theme when showing a design to a client.

  • You can use layer locking to prevent accidental changes to layers containing page elements that should not be altered. For example, if you're going to be printing on stock that is preprinted with a letterhead and background graphic, you can include that letterhead and background graphic in a layer so that you can see what the finished printed piece will look like, and then you can lock that layer and omit it from printing.

If you have used image-editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop, you may already be familiar with the concept of layers. However, layers have some implications in QuarkXPress layouts that they do not have in image editing:

  • Even if a front layer is showing, you can "click through" any empty portions of that layer and select items on underlying layers, without having to manually change the active layer.

  • Each layer exists on every page in a QuarkXPress layout, rather than being specific to a page or spread. This makes it easy to control the appearance of every page in a long layout.

  • Text in a rear layer can run around objects in a front layer.

Creating layers

To create a layer, click the New Layer button in the Layers palette. The new layer is added to the Layers palette, in front of the active layer. The new layer is active by default, which means that any items you create will be placed on that layer.

To create a new item on a particular layer, first click the layer's name in the Layers palette to activate that layer. Then use any of the standard item creation tools to create items on the layer.

Selecting layers

The active layer is identified in the Layers palette by the Edit icon . The active layer is the layer where any new items you create will be put. You can set the active layer in two ways:

  • Click the layer name in the Layers palette.

  • Select a single item on the page. That item's layer automatically becomes the active layer.

Only one layer can be active at a time (even if you select items on more than one layer at a time). However, you can select more than one layer at a time (for example, if you want to merge the layers). To select more than one layer, do one of the following things:

  • Select items from more than one layer (for example, by selecting everything on the page).

  • To select consecutive layers in the palette, press Shift while you click the first and last layer in the range you want to select.

  • To select non-consecutive layers in the palette, press Command/Ctrl while clicking the layers you want to select.

To deselect a layer when multiple layers are selected, press Command/Ctrl and click the layer you want to deselect.

Showing and hiding layers

The Visible column in the Layers palette controls which layers display at any given time. When the Visible icon appears in the Visible column, a layer is visible.

  • To show or hide a layer, click in the Visible column to the left of that layer's name. You can also double-click a layer to display its Attributes dialog box, check or uncheck Visible in the dialog box, and then click OK.

  • To show or hide all the layers in a layout at once, select a layer name and choose Show All Layers or Hide All Layers from the Layers palette context menu.

  • To hide all layers except the active layer, select the name of the layer that you want to be active and then choose Hide Other Layers from the Layers palette context menu. Alternatively, you can press Control/Ctrl while clicking the Visible icon of the layer you want to display; all other layers will be hidden.

  • To display all layers except the active layer, choose Show Other Layers from the Layers palette context menu.

When you use the Find/Change feature, QuarkXPress searches hidden layers as well as visible layers. If a match is found on a hidden layer, QuarkXPress temporarily displays the hidden text box or text path.

When you check the spelling in a layout or story, QuarkXPress searches all layers in the layout or story. If questionable spelling is encountered on a hidden layer, QuarkXPress temporarily displays the hidden text box or text path.

When a layer is hidden, that layer displays unchecked by default in the Layers pane of the Print dialog box, and consequently that layer will not print (unless you click to check the layer manually in the Print dialog box).

When you create an item on a hidden layer, that item remains visible until you deselect the item.

Determining which layer an item is on

There are two ways to determine which layer an item is on:

  • Look at the object's bounding box and handles (you may need to choose View > Guides to see them). Each layer (except the Default layer) is assigned a unique color swatch in the Layers palette, and the bounding boxes and handles for objects on that layer are drawn in the layer's color.

  • Look at the Layers palette. When you select a page item, the Item icon displays in the Layers palette next to the name of the layer that contains the selected item. If you select multiple items on different layers, the Item icon displays next to each layer that contains a selected item.

Deleting layers

You cannot delete the Default layer, but you can delete any other layer. When you delete layers, you can choose whether to delete the items on the layers or move the items to another layer. To delete a layer:

  1. In the Layers palette, select the layer or layers to delete.

  2. Click the Delete Layer button .

  3. If there are items on the layers you are deleting, the Delete Layer dialog box displays. Choose an option:

    • If the layers include items that you want to delete, check Delete items on selected Layer(s).

    • If the layers include items that you want to move to another layer, uncheck Delete items on selected Layer(s), and choose a destination layer from the Move items to Layer drop-down menu.

  4. Click OK.

To delete all unused layers in a layout, choose Delete Unused Layers from the palette menu.

Changing layer options

You can control the following options for the selected layer in the Attributes dialog box:

  • Name: The layer's name, as displayed in the Layers palette.

  • Layer Color: The color used for the bounding boxes and handles of objects on that layer.

  • Visible: Controls whether the layer is visible in QuarkXPress.

  • Suppress Output: Controls whether the layer is set to print when the layout is printed. You can override this setting in the Print dialog box.

  • Locked: Controls whether you can manipulate objects on this layer.

  • Keep Runaround: Controls whether runaround from objects on this layer applies to underlying layers when this layer is hidden.

To display the Attributes dialog box for a layer, double-click the layer's name in the Layers palette, or select a layer name in the palette and then choose Edit Layer from the palette menu.

You can control layer options in the Attributes dialog box.

You can set the default values of the Visible, Locked, Suppress Output, and Keep Runaround check boxes for new layers in the Layers panes of the Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit menu).

Moving items to a different layer

The Layers palette provides three methods for moving existing items to a different layer. Using the Item tool , select the items you want to move, and then do one of the following things:

  • Click the Move Item to Layer button , and then choose the target layer in the Move Items dialog box.

  • Drag the Item icon to the target layer.

  • Cut the items from their current layer and paste them on the target layer.

To place a copy of an item on a different layer, press Control/Ctrl while dragging the Item icon to the target layer in the Layers palette.

You can move master page items on layout pages from the Default layer to other layers, but those items will no longer be master page items if you do so.

Copying and pasting items between layers

There is an option in the Layers palette that allows you to set Paste To Remember Layers.

Placeholder for image of the Layers palette.

This option is turned on by default. When it is on and one or more items are copied and pasted, then the elements will be pasted on the same layer from which they were copied. Layer matching is done by name, so if the item comes from a different document with different layer names, a new layer with that name will be created.

If the preference is turned off, all items will be pasted on the layer that is currently active.

Changing the stacking order of layers

Stacking on a layer works the same way it does on a "plain" page. Within a layer, each item has its own position in the stacking order (the front-to-back positioning of the items on the layer). When you draw items on a layer, new items are stacked in front of existing items on that layer. You can use the Send to Back, Send Backward, Bring to Front, and Bring Forward commands (Item menu) to change the stacking order of items within a layer, but these commands do not move items to different layers. However, everything on a front layer displays in front of everything on a rear layer.

To change the stacking order of layers, you can drag a layer to a new position in the Layers palette. (The layer at the top of the Layers palette is the frontmost layer of the layout.)

Layers and text runaround

Items on layers follow the standard runaround rule in QuarkXPress: Text can only wrap around items that are in front of that text. For example, if you draw a small picture box in the center of a column of text, the text will wrap around the picture box by default.

When you hide a layer, you can either show or hide the text runaround caused by the obstructing items on that layer. By default, text runaround forced by hidden items is maintained.

  • To hide the text runaround forced by items on a hidden layer, double-click the hidden layer in the Layers palette to display the Attributes dialog box, and then uncheck Keep Runaround and click OK.

  • To change this default runaround setting for new layers, uncheck Keep Runaround in the Layers pane of the Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit menu).

Duplicating layers

To duplicate a layer, select that layer in the Layers palette and choose Duplicate Layer from the Layers palette menu. The new, duplicate layer is placed directly in front of the original layer.

If you duplicate a story with linked text boxes that have been placed on different layers, you will observe the following behaviors:

  • If you duplicate the layer containing the first box in the story, all of the text in that box, as well as the text in the linked boxes that complete the story, is duplicated. The first box displays on the duplicated layer and displays an overflow symbol.

  • If you duplicate a layer that includes one of the boxes in the middle of the story, all of the text in that box, as well as the text in the linked boxes that complete the story, is duplicated. The middle box displays on the duplicated layer and displays an overflow symbol. None of the text from any preceding boxes in the story is copied onto the duplicate layer.

  • If you duplicate the layer that contains only the last box in a story, only the text in that last box, and none of the text from any preceding boxes in the story, is copied to the duplicate layer.

Merging layers

When you merge two or more layers, all the items on all of the layers move to the same layer. Stacking order is maintained both within and among all of the merged layers (in other words, everything on a front layer remains in front of everything on a rear layer). To merge layers:

  1. In the Layers palette, select the layers to be merged.

  2. Click the Merge Layers button in the Layers palette. The Merge Layers dialog box displays.

  3. Choose a target layer from the Choose Destination Layer drop-down menu.

  4. Click OK. The visual indicators for the merged items display the color of the layer to which you merged, and the layers that you selected for merging are deleted.

Layers cannot be merged when one of the selected layers is locked.

Items may be merged from the Default layer, but the Default layer is never deleted by a merge operation.

Locking items on layers

To avoid inadvertently making changes to items on a layer, you can use the Layers palette to lock the entire layer.

Layer locking is independent from item locking. Items locked using Item > Lock can still be selected and edited; items on a locked layer cannot be selected at all. If you lock an item on a layer using Item > Lock, and then lock and unlock the layer, the item retains the item lock even after the layer is unlocked.

The Lock column in the Layers palette controls the locking of layers. To lock layers, use one of the following methods:

  • To lock or unlock a layer, click in the Lock column to the left of the layer's name. You can also double-click the layer to display its Attributes dialog box, check or uncheck Locked, and then click OK.

  • To lock all but one layer, press Command/Ctrl and click in the Lock column next to the layer you want to edit.

  • To lock all layers, choose Lock All Layers from the palette menu.

Using master pages with layers

You can also use layers on master pages. Remember that items that come from a master page that reside on the same layer will always be positioned behind items on the document page.

If you downsave to QuarkXPress 9 (which did not support layers on master pages), all items on the master page will be put on the default layer and this might create a different stacking order than existed in QuarkXPress 10.

Suppressing printout of layers

Just as you can suppress the printout of items such as picture boxes, you can suppress the printout of layers. To suppress the printout of a layer, double-click that layer in the Layers palette. In the Attributes dialog box, check Suppress Output, and then click OK.

When Suppress Output is checked for a layer, that layer displays unchecked by default in the Layers pane of the Print dialog box, and consequently that layer will not print (unless you check the layer manually in the Print dialog box).

The Print dialog box provides settings for controlling which layers will print.

To change the default print setting for new layers, check Suppress Output in the Layers panes of the Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit menu).

Using PDF layers

If you export a layout that includes layers as a PDF file, you can separately control the following:

  • Which layers are included in the exported PDF files

  • Whether or not QuarkXPress layers exported as native PDF layers

For more information, see "Exporting a layout in PDF format."

Working with lists

The Lists feature lets you collect the text of paragraphs that have specific character or paragraph style sheets applied to them. Although the Lists feature is most often used for creating a table of contents, you can also use it to create a list of figures or pictures used in a publication.

Preparing for lists

Before you create a list, you must create and apply style sheets in your document. Begin by creating style sheets to be used in a table of contents, such as "Chapter Name," "Section Name," and "Body Text." Then create another paragraph style sheet for the formatted table of contents.

Including style sheets in a list

The first step in creating a list is to decide what style sheets you want to include in the list. To create a table of contents, you might include chapter and section style sheets in your list, since a table of contents generally lists chapter titles and their respective page numbers. You can include paragraph and character style sheets in lists.

Specifying levels in a list

You will also need to decide how the different levels in the paragraph style sheets will be defined before generating a list. You might want chapter headings to be at the first level and subjects within a chapter to be at the second level. For example, if you are writing a manual about an application, and a chapter in the manual is titled "File Menu," you might want the chapter heading "File Menu" to be the first level on your list. The "New," "Open," "Close," and "Save" items (subheadings in the "File Menu" chapter) could be at the second level. Making decisions such as these beforehand will simplify the process of generating a list.

Creating a list

Once you have created and applied the style sheets in your document and have decided which ones will be included in your list, you are ready to start creating your list. Choose Edit > Lists and click New to display the Edit List dialog box and enter a name in the Name field.

The Available Styles list displays all of the style sheets in the active project. Select each style sheet you want to use in the list and click Add to add it to the Styles in List list. For example, if you want to include all headings that use the "Heading 1" and "Heading 2" style sheets in a TOC, add these two style sheets to the Styles in List list.

Once you've indicated which style sheets should determine what goes into the TOC, you can specify how the TOC should be formatted. For each style in the Styles in List list, choose a Level, a Numbering option, and a Format As style sheet:

  • Level determines how the contents of the list are indented on the Lists palette (higher levels are indented further).

  • Numbering lets you control if and where the list includes the page number for each occurrence of a style sheet.

  • Format As lets you specify the style sheet to be applied to each level of the automatically generated TOC.

You can use the Edit List dialog box to create lists for things like automatic tables of contents.

Importing lists from another document

QuarkXPress lets you append lists from another document or from the Lists dialog box (Edit > Lists), or by using the Append command (File > Append).

Navigating with lists

To view a list, display the Lists palette (Window menu), select the list in the List Name drop-down menu, and then click Update. The selected list displays in the Lists palette.

You can use the Lists palette to navigate in a layout.

If your article contains multiple layouts, you can choose a different layout from the Show List For drop-down list.

To locate a particular line in the active list, enter a word from that line in the palette's Find field. The list in the palette scrolls to the first appearance of that word in the list.

To jump to a particular paragraph, double-click it in the Lists palette. The window scrolls to that paragraph's location in the layout.

Building lists

To create a TOC (or other type of list) in the layout, place the text insertion point where you want the list to go, then click Build in the Lists palette. The list is built automatically. The style sheets you selected for the list in the Format As drop-down menu (New List dialog box) are applied automatically.

If the text in the document is on the pasteboard, then a dagger character (Mac OS X) or the characters "PB " (Windows) displays next to the text in the built list instead of a page number.

Updating lists

The Lists palette is not automatically updated as you work. When you make changes to text, you must update the list to be sure it is current. Clicking the Update button in the Lists palette scans the document for list items, and rebuilds a list in the Lists palette.

To update a list that you have already flowed into a text box, select the box, click Update to make sure the list is up-to-date, and then click Build. The application detects that there is already a copy of the list in the layout and displays an alert asking if you want to Insert a new copy of the list or Replace the existing version. To update the existing list, click Replace.

Working with indexes

In QuarkXPress, indexing is accomplished by marking words in documents as first level, second level, third level, or fourth level index entries. You can create cross-references and choose whether index entries cover a word, a number of paragraphs, a text selection, or all the text until the next occurrence of a specific style sheet. When it is time to build the index, you specify a format (nested or run-in), punctuation, a master page, and style sheets for the various levels. QuarkXPress then creates and styles the index for you.

Software can automate the process of typing, formatting, and updating page numbers in an index, but a person has to decide what goes into a meaningful, useful index. Since the process cannot be fully automated, it may take extra time to create an index, but when your readers are able to find the information they need, it will be time well spent.

Specifying the index marker color

When you add a word to an index, QuarkXPress tags it with brackets or a box; these are called index markers. Index markers are displayed in a document when the Index palette is open (Windows > Index). You can customize the color of index markers using the Index Preferences dialog box.

  1. Choose QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Index.

  2. Click the Index Marker Color button to display a color picker.

  3. Use the sliders, arrows, fields, or color wheel to specify a color for the index markers.

  4. Click OK to close the color picker; then click OK to close the Index Preferences dialog box.

When you index a range of text, it is marked with brackets. When you place the Text Insertion bar in text and enter an index entry, the location is marked with a box.

Creating index entries

Each item in an index, whether it is one word or several, is called an entry. Each entry is assigned a level. Levels indicate the hierarchy of the entry, from first to fourth. First level entries are the most general, and fourth level entries are the most specific.

QuarkXPress lets you create four levels of index entries in a nested index and two levels of index entries in a run-in index.

Creating a first-level index entry

A first-level index entry is a primary topic sorted alphabetically in an index.

Before you start adding words to the index, you need to decide whether you are creating a nested index or a run-in index. A nested index has up to four levels of information with entries separated by paragraph returns and different style sheets. A run-in index has two levels of information with second level entries immediately following first-level entries in the same paragraph.

  1. Place the Text Insertion bar in the text or select a range of text to establish the beginning of the text you want to index.

  2. To enter text for the first-level entry in the Text field of the Index palette (View menu), select text in the document or type in the field.

  3. To override the alphabetical indexing of the entry, enter text in the Sort As field. For example, if the entry is "20th Century," you might want it sorted as "Twentieth Century." This does not affect the spelling of the index entry.

  4. Choose First Level from the Level drop-down menu.

  5. To override the default character formatting applied to a page number or cross-reference, choose another character style sheet from the Style drop-down menu. The default formatting is the character style of the entry text.

  6. Choose an option from the Scope drop-down menu to specify the range of text the index entry covers.

  7. Click the Add button on the Index palette; the first-level index entry is listed alphabetically in the Entries list. The indexed text is marked with brackets or a box in the document. You can also click the Add All button to add all occurrences of the selected text to the Entries list.

You can add an index entry by selecting the text in the document, displaying the context menu, and selecting Add to Index. The entry will be added using the selected levels, style, and scope. The displayed context menu is the same as the context menu for a text box, with the exception of Add to Index.

If you select a word, add it to an index, and then try to add the selected word to the index again (for example, under a different level), you will receive an alert: "An index reference already exists at this location." To index the same word more than once, place the Text Insertion bar in the word, then enter the desired word in the Text field. The second index entry displays a box plus brackets for the index marker.

Pressing Option/Alt changes the Add button to Add Reversed . The Add Reversed button adds an entry to the Entries list in reverse order and adds a comma to the entry. For example, "Elaine DeKooning" is added as "DeKooning, Elaine" when you click the Add Reversed button. "Lila Cabot Perry" would be added as "Perry, Lila Cabot."

Pressing Option/Alt changes the Add All button to Add All Reversed . Clicking the Add All Reversed button will add all occurrences of the selected text to the Entries list in reverse order.

Creating a second-, third-, or fourth-level index entry

In a nested index, second-level, third-level, and fourth-level entries are positioned under first-level entries in the new paragraph. In a run-in index, second-level entries follow first-level entries in the same paragraph.

  1. Place the Text Insertion bar at the beginning of the range of text you want to index.

  2. Use the Text, Sort As, Style, and Scope controls as you would to create a first-level index entry.

  3. Click next to an entry in the left column of the Entries list to specify that entry as the higher-level entry that the second-, third-, or fourth-level entry will go under.

    Second-, third-, and fourth-level entries are indented if the paragraph style sheet used in the built index has a left indent value.

  4. Choose Second Level, Third Level, or Fourth Level from the Level drop-down menu.

    The arrow location determines which Level options are available. The Second Level option is available when the arrow is next to a first- or second-level entry, the Third Level option is available when the arrow is next to a first-, second-, or third-level entry, and the Fourth Level option is available when the arrow is next to a first-, second-, third-, or fourth-level entry.

  5. Click the Add button . The new index entry is alphabetized and indented under the appropriate entry.

Choose Suppress Page # in the Scope drop-down menu when an index entry will be used as a heading for more levels of information. For example, if you were creating a cookbook, you might create an entry for "Cake," suppress its page number, and then list different types of cakes, such as "chocolate" or "lemon," as second- or third-level entries.

Creating cross-references

In addition to listing page numbers for index entries, you can also refer readers to other topics. For example, in a reference to "Typography," you might list "See also Fonts." To do this, you create cross-references. You can create a cross-reference to an existing entry in the index, or you can add a new entry specifically for the cross-reference. Use the Index palette (View > Show Index) to create cross-references.

Creating a cross-reference for a new index entry

To create a cross-reference for a new index entry:

  1. Place the Text Insertion bar anywhere in text (it doesn't matter where you place it because page numbers will not be listed for this entry).

  2. Enter text for the entry in the Text field of the Index palette.

  3. Use the Sort As and Level controls as you would to create any other index entry.

  4. Choose Cross-Reference from the Scope drop-down menu. Choose the type of cross-reference you want from the drop-down menu: See, See also, or See herein.

  5. Specify the index entry being cross-referenced by entering text in the field or clicking an existing entry in the list.

  6. Click the Add button. Expand the entry to see the cross-reference text.

Creating a cross-reference for an existing index entry

To create a cross-reference for an existing index entry:

  1. Place the Text Insertion bar anywhere in text (it doesn't matter where you place it because page numbers will not be listed for this entry).

  2. Select an entry in the Entries list. The entry is automatically placed in the Text field.

  3. Click the Edit button on the Index palette, double-click the entry, or select the entry and display the context menu.

  4. Choose Cross-Reference from the Scope drop-down menu. Choose the type of cross-reference you want from the drop-down menu: See, See also, or See herein.

  5. Specify the index entry being cross-referenced by entering text in the field or clicking an existing entry in the list.

To see the cross-reference text in the Entries list along with the page number references, expand the entry.

When you build an index, cross-references immediately follow page number references. They are formatted with the character style sheet specified in the Index Preferences dialog box (Edit > Preferences > Index). If you specify Entry's Style, the cross-reference will use the same style sheet as the entry it follows. Using the Style drop-down menu (Index palette) to specify a character style sheet for a cross-reference will override the style sheet you specified in the Index Preferences dialog box. The text you enter in the Cross-Reference field will have that style sheet applied; however, the style sheet will not be applied to the "See," "See also," or "See herein" part of the cross-reference.

The punctuation preceding cross-references is specified in the Before Cross-References field of the Index Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Index). If you want punctuation following a cross-reference, enter it after the cross-reference text you entered in the Index palette.

Editing an index entry

You can select an index entry and edit the information in the Text or Sort As fields. You can also select a cross-reference or page number reference and edit the information in the Style or Scope drop-down menus. You can also change an entry's level.

  1. Select an entry or reference in the Entries list. (To see the references, expand an entry.)

  2. Click the Edit button on the Index palette, double-click the entry, or select the entry and choose Edit from the context menu.

    While you are in edit mode, the Edit button displays reversed.

  3. Make any changes to the selected entry or reference. You can also select and edit other entries and references.

  4. Click the Edit button again to exit the edit mode.

Deleting an index entry

To delete an index entry and remove its index markers from the text:

  1. Select an entry or reference in the Entries list. (To see the references, expand an entry.)

  2. Display the context menu and choose Delete or click the Delete button on the Index palette.

Specifying the punctuation used in an index

The Index Preferences dialog box lets you specify the punctuation that is automatically inserted when you build an index.

  1. Choose QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Index.

  2. Enter index punctuation, including any surrounding spaces, and cross-reference style sheet in the Separation Characters fields.

    • Following Entry specifies the punctuation immediately following each entry in an index (usually a colon). For example, "QuarkXPress: xii, 16–17, 19" uses a colon and a space after the index entry "QuarkXPress."

    When a cross-reference immediately follows an index entry, the Before Cross-Reference characters are used rather than the Following Entry characters.

    • Between Page #s specifies the words or punctuation used to separate a list of page numbers (usually a comma or semicolon). For example, "QuarkXPress: xii, 16–17, 19" uses a comma and a space between page numbers.

    • Between Page Range specifies the words or punctuation used to indicate a range of pages (usually an en dash or the word "to" with a space on either side, like this: " to "). For example, "QuarkXPress: xii, 16–17, 19" uses an en dash between a range of pages.

    • Before Cross-Reference specifies the words or punctuation used before a cross-reference (usually a period, semicolon, or space). For example, "QuarkXPress: xii, 16–17, 19. See also Page Layout" uses a period and a space before the cross-reference.

    • Cross-Ref style specifies the style sheet to be used for a cross-reference. This style sheet is applied only to "See," "See also," and "See herein."

    • Between Entries specifies the words or punctuation used between entry levels in a run-in index (usually a semicolon or period). A run-in index lists the entries and sub-entries of an index entry in a paragraph rather than with nested tabs. For example, "QuarkXPress: xii, 16–17, 19; Printing from: 62–64; Typesetting in: 32, 34" uses a semicolon between entries.

    In a nested index, the Between Entries characters are used as the ending punctuation for each paragraph.

  3. Click OK.

The completed index consists of formatted text, not of dynamic links to indexed text. If you continue to edit text or the Entries list, you need to rebuild the index.

You can enter up to 72 characters in any of the Separation Characters fields. You can also use certain "XPress Tags" in the Separation Characters fields. For example, if you enter \t in the Following Entry field, when you build your index, a default tab will automatically be inserted after your entry.

Building an index

Use the Build Index dialog box to create an index from the contents of the Index palette.

When you build an index, QuarkXPress compiles the list, formats it according to your specifications, and flows it into pages based on the master page you choose. Index preferences are document-specific when set with a document open.

Before building the index, create a master page with an automatic text box for your index. Next, create paragraph style sheets for the section heads and all the levels used in your index. Normally, the levels are distinguished by varying indentations.

To build an index:

  1. Choose Utilities > Build Index or display the context menu for the Index palette and choose Build Index.

  2. Click Nested or Run-in for the Format. If your index is organized with more than two levels of information, you should create a nested index. If you decide to create a run-in index, all levels of information for any entry will be listed in the same paragraph with no hierarchy.

  3. Check Replace Existing Index to overwrite the existing index.

  4. To add headings to each alphabetical section in the index, check Add Letter Headings and choose a style sheet from the drop-down menu.

  5. Choose a Master Page for the index (only master pages with automatic text boxes are listed). QuarkXPress automatically adds the necessary pages to the end of the document to contain the index. If you specify a facing-page master page, a right-facing page is added first.

  6. Choose style sheets for each level of the index from the Level Styles drop-down menus. If you clicked Run-in for the Format, only the First Level drop-down menu is available (because all the levels are flowed into the same paragraph).

  7. Click OK to close the Build Index dialog box and create the index.

If you need to compare two versions of an index, uncheck Replace Existing Index in the Build Index dialog box (Utilities menu).

Editing final indexes

After you build an index, you need to look it over closely. Check that the index is thorough, the cross-references are appropriate, and the levels are logical. See if you like the punctuation and formatting. It is unlikely that you will be absolutely happy with the first index you build. You can solve some issues by editing and rebuilding the index, while other issues will require local formatting of the index text.

Nonprinting text in an index

If the text marked in brackets will not print because it is on the pasteboard, obscured by another item, or overflowing its box, then a dagger character † (Mac OS X) or the characters "PB" with a space after the B (Windows) displays next to the entry in the index instead of a page number.

Mac OS X only: To search for the dagger character, enter Option+T in the Find what field of the Find/Change dialog box (Edit menu), and then see if you can solve the problem in the document or simply remove the daggers from the built index.

Windows only: To search for the "PB "characters, enter them (including the space) in the Find what field of the Find/Change dialog box (Edit menu), and then see if you can solve the problem in the document or simply remove the characters from the built index.

Editing and rebuilding the index

To solve issues with the punctuation, the index entries, or the organization of the index, go back to the Index palette, the Index Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Index), or the Build Index dialog box (Utilities menu). Make the necessary changes, and rebuild the index.

Updating the index

If you edit an indexed document after you build the index, you should build the index again. Because QuarkXPress will not update the index text automatically, you should build your final index only when you are fairly certain the document is final.

Applying local formatting to the index

When you have an index you are happy with — and are almost certain the publication will not change — you can often still improve your index with local formatting. For example, if you only have one entry each under the headings "W," "X," "Y," and "Z," you might combine them into a single heading for "W–Z." Or you might want to use the Find/Change dialog box (Edit menu) to apply type styles to certain words. Remember that the changes will not be reflected in future versions of the index if you decide to delete or change entries at this stage.

Working with books

Multiple-document publications can be challenging to manage. Page numbers need to be consecutive, colors and style sheets to be synchronized. Books help you meet this challenge.

Books are QuarkXPress files that display as windows containing links to individual layouts from single or multiple projects, called chapters. Once chapters are added to a book, you can open, close, and track chapters through the Book palette. QuarkXPress lets you synchronize style sheets and other specifications used in the chapters of a book, print chapters from the Book palette, and automatically update page numbers across chapters. You can also export to multiple PDFs (per chapter) or export all chapters to a single PDF from the Book palette.

You can open only one book at a time. While QuarkXPress is running, it remembers recent opened books so that you can switch to/open another book from the palette history. Books can be opened by more than one user at the same time, so members of a workgroup can access different chapters. Books stay open until you close them or until you quit QuarkXPress. Changes made to books are saved when you close the Book palette or quit QuarkXPress.

Changes to books (such as adding or reordering chapters) are saved automatically when you close books, or when you quit QuarkXPress. When you open and edit chapters, the chapter documents need to be saved the same way as any standalone QuarkXPress project, by using the Save command (File menu).

As members of a workgroup make changes to a book — for example, opening or reordering chapters in a book — the book is updated to reflect the changes. Only the first user to open a book can make changes to the book. All other users can open the book in read-only mode. A user can open chapters of the book that have not yet been opened by other members, make changes and save. The other users will see the modified state.

Creating books

In QuarkXPress, a book is a collection of documents (chapters). You can create a new book at any time. To create a new book:

  1. Choose File > New > Book.

  2. Use the controls in the dialog box to specify a location for the new book file.

  3. Enter a name for the book in the Book Name/File name field.

  4. Click Create. The new book displays as a window in front of all open documents.

When a book is created a Job Jacket XML file with the same name is also created in the same location. This Job Jacket file is automatically attached to the QuarkXPress project when it is added to the book. When the book is copied to another location, this Job Jacket XML file must also be copied to the new location.

If you store book files in a shared location, multiple users can open books and edit chapters. To use the Book feature in a multi-user environment, all users must have the same path from their computers to the book; therefore, the book must be stored on a common network server rather than a user's computer that is also accessing the book.

Legacy books are not supported in 10 and books in QuarkXPress 10 are not compatible with books from QuarkXPress 3 to 9. To recreate legacy books you must add existing chapters to a new book after saving them in the QuarkXPress 10 format.

Working with chapters

Books contain individual print layouts from QuarkXPress projects (called chapters). To create chapters, you add print layouts from a single project or multiple projects to open books. Chapters are opened through the Book palette rather than the Open command (File menu). You can rearrange the chapters within a book and you can remove chapters from a book. The chapters in a book must be stored on the same volume as the book.

Adding chapters to books

To add chapters to an open book:

  1. Click the Add Chapter button in the Book palette.

  2. Use the controls in the dialog box to locate the first print layout to add to the book. The dialog box presents the layouts available in the project to select from. You can select a single layout or multiple layouts to be added to the book. (By default all layouts in a project are selected to be added to the book.) Each layout is treated as a separate chapter. When you add the first chapter to a book, it becomes the master chapter by default. The master chapter defines the style sheets, colors, hyphenation and justification specifications, lists, and dashes and stripes that will be used throughout the book. These attributes are specific to the master chapter: nonmaster chapters have attributes independent of those in the master chapter.

    QuarkXPress only supports adding Print layouts to a book. Ebook and App Studio layouts are not supported.

  3. Select the project and the print layouts in the list and click Add.

    When legacy projects are added without saving them in a QuarkXPress 10 format, a new file with a suffix of _001 (_002, etc) is created and the newly saved project is added to the book. The legacy project remains untouched.

  4. Repeat steps 1–3 to add additional chapters to the book.

As you add chapters, they are listed in the Book palette. If a chapter is selected in the Book palette when you click the Add Chapter button , the next chapter is added immediately after that chapter. If no chapter is selected, the next chapter is added to the end of the list.

A chapter can belong to only one book. If you also want to use a chapter in another book, use the Save As command (File menu) to create a copy of the document. Add the copy of the document to the other book. Placing a chapter in another book may change the book's page numbering.

Chapter status

Once you have chapters in a book, you and other users can begin to open, close, and track chapters using the Book palette. The Status column in the Book palette shows the current state of each chapter:

  • Available indicates that you can open the chapter.

  • Open indicates that you already have the chapter open on your computer.

  • Modified indicates that the chapter has been opened and edited independently of the book. To update the status to Available, reopen the chapter through the Book palette, and then close the chapter.

  • Missing indicates that the chapter's file has been moved since it was added to the book. Double-click the chapter name to display a dialog box; then locate the file.

Opening chapters in books

Although multiple users can open the same book, only one user at a time can open a chapter. To open a chapter, the Status column must show that the chapter is Available or Modified. Double-click the name of an available chapter to open it.

Opening chapters independently of books

If you need to work on a computer that is not part of the network where the book resides (for example, if you need to edit a chapter at home), you can work on a copy of a chapter independently of its book. When you are finished with the chapter, copy it back to its original location on the network; it will display in the Book palette as Modified.

To ensure that other users do not edit the original chapter while you are editing a copy, you can place the original chapter file in another folder so its status will display in the Book palette as Missing.

Reordering chapters in books

You can reorder chapters in a book at any time, regardless of their status. When you reorder chapters, automatic page numbers are updated. Click the chapter name to select it; then click a Move Chapter button in the Book palette. The selected chapter will move up or down one row.

Removing chapters from books

You can remove a chapter from a book at any time. Click the chapter name to select it; then click the Remove Chapter button . The chapter name is removed from the Book palette and the links to the chapter are broken. The chapter becomes a standard QuarkXPress document.

Controlling page numbers

If your chapters have sections (Page > Section) when you add them to a book, the sections and page numbers are maintained. For example, each chapter in a book might be a new section. If your chapters do not have sections, QuarkXPress assigns sequential page numbers to the chapters in a book. For example, if the first chapter in a book is 10 pages long, the second chapter starts on page 11.

You can add and remove sections to change the page numbering of a book. If a document page has an automatic page number character on it, that page will display the appropriate page number.

Working with sectioned chapters

If a chapter contains a section start, the section page numbering remains in effect throughout the book until QuarkXPress encounters a new section start. For example, when the first chapter in a book is a section with a page number prefix of "A" all the pages in following chapters will have the "A" prefix until QuarkXPress encounters a new section. In this example, the second chapter might be a new section with a "B" prefix.

You can add, change, and delete sections in book chapters at any time (Page > Section). If you remove all the sections from all the chapters in a book, the book will revert to sequential page numbering.

To view chapter page numbers in the Book palette, you must use automatic page numbering.

Working with nonsectioned chapters

If chapters do not have sections, QuarkXPress creates a "book chapter start" for the first page of each chapter. A book chapter start tells a chapter to begin its page numbering after the last page of the previous chapter. To override a book chapter start and create a section, open the chapter and choose Page > Section. When you add pages to a chapter, reorder chapters, or remove chapters, subsequent pages and chapters will be numbered according to this section start.

For output chapter pages to accurately reflect the page numbering of the book, page numbers should be placed using the Current Page Number character.

Any user who opens a book can add, reorder, and delete chapters. The user can also add sections to chapters to override the sequential page numbering or synchronize chapters. You may want to assign these tasks to one user (such as the editor) and ask other users to simply open and close chapters through the palette.

If you open a chapter outside of its associated QuarkXPress book (meaning that you didn't use the Book palette to open it), the page numbers may temporarily change. If the chapter contains book chapter starts, which automatically update page numbers across chapters, then the chapter will begin on page number 1 while you are editing outside the book. When you reopen the chapter using the Book palette, the page numbers will automatically update. If the chapter contains regular section starts, then the page numbers will not be affected when editing outside the book.

Synchronizing chapters

To ensure that all the style sheets, colors, hyphenation and justification specifications, lists, and dashes and stripes used in book chapters are the same, you can synchronize these specifications to match those in a master chapter. By default, the first chapter in the book is the master chapter, but you can change the master chapter at any time.

When you synchronize chapters, all the specifications in each chapter are compared to the master chapter and modified as necessary. After you synchronize chapters, each chapter in the book will have the same style sheets, colors, hyphenation and justification specifications, lists, and dashes and stripes as the master chapter.

Specifying the master chapter

By default, the first chapter you add to a book is the master chapter. The master chapter is indicated by an M to the left of the chapter name in the Book palette. To change the master chapter, click to select the new master chapter. Then click the blank area to the left of the chapter name; the master chapter icon M moves to the new chapter.

Synchronizing specifications

Before you synchronize the specifications in a book, first make sure that the style sheets, colors, hyphenation and justification specifications, lists, and dashes and stripes in the current master chapter are defined correctly. Then:

  1. Make sure all the chapters in the book have a status of Available. If a chapter is unavailable, its specifications will not be synchronized.

  2. Select the chapters you want to synchronize. To select a range of chapters, click the first chapter and press Shift while you click the last chapter in the range. To select nonconsecutive chapters, press Command/Ctrl while you click the chapters.

  3. Click the Synchronize Book button in the Book palette. The Synchronize Selected Chapters dialog box displays.

  4. Click the Style Sheets, Colors, H&Js, Lists, or Dashes & Stripes tab to choose from a list of those specifications. The Available list displays all the appropriate specifications. Select the specifications you want to synchronize and double-click them, or click the arrow to move them to the Include column.

  5. To synchronize all the specifications in the Synchronize Selected Chapters dialog box, click the Synch All button.

  6. Click OK. Each chapter in the book is opened, compared to the master chapter, modified as necessary, and saved. When you synchronize chapters, they are modified as follows:

  • Specifications with the same name are compared; chapter specifications are edited as necessary to match specifications in the master chapter.

  • Specifications in the master chapter that are missing from other chapters are added to those chapters.

  • Specifications in other chapters that are not defined in the master chapter remain untouched.

If you make changes that affect the specifications in a book, you will need to synchronize the chapters again.

You can use synchronization to make global changes to any of the specifications in a book. For example, if you decide to change a spot color used throughout a book, change the color's definition in the master chapter; then click the Synchronize Book button .

Printing chapters

The Book palette provides a quick method for printing multiple chapters with the same settings. You can print an entire book or just selected chapters from the Book palette. To print chapters in an open book:

  1. Make sure the chapters you want to print have a status of Available or Open. You cannot print chapters that are listed as Missing or are currently in use by other users.

  2. To print the entire book, make sure no chapters are selected. To choose one chapter, click it. To select consecutive chapters, press Shift while you click them. To select nonconsecutive chapters, press Command/Ctrl while you click them.

  3. Click the Print Chapters button in the Book palette to display the Print dialog box.

  4. To print all the pages in all the selected chapters, choose All from the Pages drop-down menu.

  5. Specify other print settings as usual, or choose an option from the Print Style drop-down menu. All the pages or chapters will print with these settings.

  6. Click OK. QuarkXPress will open all the chapters, print them, and then close each chapter. If a chapter is missing or in use by someone else, then the book will not print.

In fields that require you to enter page numbers (for example, the Print dialog box), you must enter the complete page number, including any prefix, or an absolute page number. An absolute page number is a page's actual position relative to the first page of a document, regardless of the way in which the document is sectioned. To specify an absolute page number in a dialog box, precede the number you enter with a plus (+) sign. For example, to display the first page in a document, enter "+1."

Generate a PDF from a Book

The Book palette provides a quick method for producing a PDF. You can produce a single PDF based on the entire book or separate PDF's of selected chapters. To produce a PDF:

  1. Make sure the chapters you want be in the PDF have a status of Available or Open. You cannot use chapters that are listed as Missing or are currently in use by other users.

  2. To include the entire book, make sure no chapters are selected. To choose one chapter, click it. To select consecutive chapters, press Shift while you click them. To select nonconsecutive chapters, press Command/Ctrl while you click them.

  3. Next to the Export as PDF button is the Single File check box :

    • Check the check box to generate a single PDF for all or selected chapters. You will be prompted to enter a file name for the PDF.

    • Leave the check box unchecked to generate multiple PDFs per chapter. You will be prompted to enter a file name for the PDF and the first chapter is exported with the given name and subsequent chapters use the same name with the suffix _002, _003 etc.

  4. Click the Export as PDF button in the Book palette to display the Export as PDF dialog box.

  5. To print all the pages in all the selected chapters, choose All from the Pages drop-down menu.

  6. Choose an option from the PDF Style drop-down menu. All the pages or chapters will print with these settings.

  7. Check the Open PDF after Export check box to open the PDF after the file has been exported.

  8. Click Options to specify the other PDF output options.

  9. Click OK. QuarkXPress will open all the chapters, produce the PDF, and then close each chapter. If a chapter is missing or in use by someone else, then the PDF will not be created.

In fields that require you to enter page numbers (for example, the Export as PDF dialog box), you must enter the complete page number, including any prefix, or an absolute page number. An absolute page number is a page's actual position relative to the first page of a document, regardless of the way in which the document is sectioned. To specify an absolute page number in a dialog box, precede the number you enter with a plus (+) sign. For example, to display the first page in a document, enter "+1."

Creating indexes and tables of contents for books

QuarkXPress lets you generate an index and a table of contents for an entire book. These functions are accomplished through the lists and indexing features rather than through the Book palette. However, all the chapters in a book must be Available to generate a complete list or index.

Indexes for books

Creating an index involves using the Index palette (View menu) to tag text as an index entry. You specify punctuation for the index in the Index Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Index). When a book is complete, you generate the index using the Build Index dialog box (Utilities menu).

Lists for books

In QuarkXPress, a list is a compilation of text that is styled with specific paragraph style sheets. For example, you can take all the text in your "Chapter Name" style sheet and all the text in your "Section Head" style sheet and compile a table of contents with two levels. Lists are not limited to tables of contents — for example, you can create a list of illustrations from the style sheets used on captions. Generating lists involves the Lists dialog box (Edit menu) and the Lists palette (View menu).

Working with libraries

Libraries are convenient for storing frequently used page items such as logos, publication mastheads, legal text, and photographs. You can store up to 2,000 entries in an individual library. A library entry can be a text box, text path, picture box, line, multiple-selected items, or a group. To move entries in and out of libraries, you simply drag them or cut/copy and paste them.

Libraries are good for storing items that may be needed at any time in a layout. For example, corporate logos, legal information, commonly used pictures and text, chart formats, and clip art are all good candidates for library entries. Items with hard-to-remember formatting can also be saved in a library.

Use the Library palette's scroll bar to scroll vertically through library entries. Drag the resize box in the lower-right corner of a Library palette to resize it. You can expand a Library palette by clicking its zoom box. Click the zoom box again to return to the previous display.

A Library palette

QuarkXPress libraries are not cross-platform, so libraries must be opened using the platform on which they were created.

Creating libraries

You can create a new library any time, as long as you have fewer than 25 files open. To create a new library:

  1. Choose File > New > Library.

    When you create a new library, it stays open until you manually close it. When you launch QuarkXPress, any library palettes that were previously open are reopened automatically and placed in the default library positions.

  2. Use the controls in the dialog box to specify a location for the new library file.

  3. Enter a name for the library in the Library Name/File name field.

  4. Click Create.

Adding library entries

When you add entries to a library, copies of the items are placed in the library and displayed as thumbnails. The original items are not removed from the document. To add entries to an open library:

  1. Select the Item tool .

  2. Select the items or group of items to place in the library. To select multiple items, press the Shift key while clicking them. However, if you select multiple items, they will be saved in the library as one entry and not as individual items.

  3. Drag the items or group into the library and release the mouse button when the Library pointer displays. The library entry is placed between the arrow icons.

Retrieving library entries

To place a library entry into a document, select any tool and click the library entry. Drag the entry into the document. A copy of the library entry is placed in the document.

Manipulating library entries

You can rearrange the order of entries within a library, move entries from one library to another, replace and delete library entries.

  • To rearrange an entry within a library, click it and drag it to a new position.

  • To copy an entry from one library into another, click it and drag it to the other open library.

  • To replace an entry in a library, select the replacement items in a document; then choose Edit > Copy. Click the entry in the library to select it and choose Edit > Paste.

  • To remove an entry from a library on Mac OS X, click it and choose Edit > Clear, Edit > Cut, or press Delete. To remove an entry from a library on Windows, choose Edit (Library palette menu) > Delete or Edit > Cut.

Windows only: When copying, pasting, or deleting library items on Windows, use the Edit menu at the top of the Library palette.

If you move a high-resolution picture after importing it into your document, you will need to update the path to the picture with the Usage command (Utilities menu) when you move the library entry onto a document.

Working with labels

QuarkXPress lets you manage your library entries by applying labels to them. You can apply the same label to multiple entries and you can selectively display library entries according to their labels. For example, if you have a library full of different corporate logos, you can label each entry with the appropriate company name.

Labeling library entries

Once you label one library entry, you can use that label for other entries. Alternatively, you can give each of your library entries a unique name. To label library entries:

  1. Double-click a library entry to display the Library Entry dialog box.

  2. Enter a descriptive name in the Label field or choose one from the Label list. To rename a library entry, enter in a new label or choose a different label from the list.

  3. Click OK.

Displaying library entries by label

To display entries by label, click the drop-down menu (Mac OS X) or Labels menu (Windows) in the upper left corner of a Library palette. Choose labels to display associated entries.

  • The menu lists All, Unlabeled, and any labels you created and applied to entries.

  • You can choose more than one label to display multiple categories of entries; a checkmark displays next to each selected label.

  • If you choose more than one label on Mac OS X, Mixed Labels is displayed in the drop-down menu. When you select the Labels menu on Windows, a checkmark displays next to labels displayed in the palette.

  • To view all library entries, regardless of label, choose All.

  • To view entries to which no label has been applied, choose Unlabeled. You can choose Unlabeled in addition to other labels.

  • To hide entries to which a label is applied, choose the label again.

Saving libraries

When you click the close box on a Library palette, QuarkXPress automatically saves changes made to the library. If you prefer, you can use the Auto Library Save feature to save each change on the fly. To enable Auto Library Save:

  1. Choose QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences ; then click Save in the list on the left to display the Save pane.

  2. Check Auto Library Save.

  3. Click OK.

Guides Palette

The Guides palette (Window > Guides) provides precision controls for creating and editing on-screen guides. You can specify a location for a guide, whether it's horizontal or vertical, whether it applies to a page or entire spread, a display color, and a view scale at which the guide displays. You can edit, copy, and paste guides; mirror guides; create grids, rows, and columns of guides; create guides from a box; and add bleed and safety guides.

See "Working with guides."

Using the Guides palette

The Guides palette provides powerful controls for manipulating guides.

The Guides palette

The Guides palette works as follows:

  • Controls across the top of the palette, from left to right, let you create new guides, mirror guides, show horizontal guides, show vertical guides, show only current guides, and delete guides.

  • To sort guides by an attribute, click the column heading for that attribute.

  • To add columns of information to the palette, choose an option from the Column Selector button at the right side of the list of columns.

  • The Spread column displays a number for each page or spread in the layout. To display a page or spread, click that spread in the Spread column. To display a spread's guides in the palette, click the arrow next to the spread. To edit a guide, double-click it.

  • To display a context menu of editing options, Control+click/Right-click in each column. For example, the context menu for the Guide column includes the following options: Cut Guide, Copy Guide, Paste Guide, Delete Guide and Select All Guides.

For information about the options in the palette menu, see "Guides palette menu."

Regardless of whether guides are showing on-screen, you can work with them in the Guides palette (Window menu) as follows:

  • To view a page or spread's guides, click the arrow next to that page or spread in the Guide column.

  • To view guides on all the pages or spreads, Option/Alt+click an arrow next to a spread.

  • To display only vertical or horizontal guides, choose Show Vertical Guides or Show Horizontal Guides from the palette menu. To display all guides, choose both.

  • To display only page guides (horizontal guides limited to a single page) or only spread guides (horizontal guides that encompass all the pages in a spread), choose Show Page Guides or Show Spread Guides from the palette menu. To display all guides choose both.

  • To display only guides on the page or spread displayed in the project window, choose Show Current Only from the palette menu.

Guides palette menu

The Guides palette menu includes the following options.

  • New Guide: Lets you create a new guide. See "Creating guides with the Guides palette."

  • Cut Guide: Cuts the selected guide.

  • Copy Guide: Copies the selected guide to the clipboard.

  • Paste Guide: Pastes the guide currently stored on the clipboard to the active page or spread.

  • Select All: Selects all guides on the active page or spread.

  • Mirror Guide: Copies the selected guide to the opposite side of the page or spread.

  • Delete Guide: Deletes the selected guide.

  • Create Grid: Lets you create a grid. See "Creating grids with the Guides palette."

  • Create Rows & Columns: Lets you create rows and columns of guides. See "Creating rows and columns of guides."

  • Create Guides from Box: Lets you create guides from a box. See "Creating guides with the Guides palette."

  • Create Bleed & Safety Guides: Lets you create bleed and safety guides. See "Creating bleed and safety guides."

  • Show/Hide Vertical Guides: Shows or hides vertical guides.

  • Show/Hide Horizontal Guides: Shows or hides horizontal guides.

  • Show/Hide Page Guides: Shows or hides guides on the active page.

  • Show/Hide Spread Guides: Shows or hides guides on the active spread.

  • Guides in Front: Toggles guides and page grids between being in front of page content and being behind page content.

  • Snap to Guides: Turns the snap-to-guides feature on or off.

  • Snap Distance: Lets you control the snap distance for the Snap to Guides feature.

  • Edit Colors: Lets you edit the colors available for guides created with the Guides palette.

  • Import: Lets you import guides from an exported guide file.

  • Export: Lets you export guides into a separate file.

See also "Working with guides."

Creating guides with the Guides palette

The Guides palette provides two methods for creating guides.

  • To create guides numerically using the Guides palette, click the Create a New Guide button at the top of the Guides palette or choose New from the palette menu. Use the Guide Attributes dialog box to specify the Location, Direction, and guide Type. You can also specify the View Scale at which the guide displays (at the default value, 0%, the guide will always display). Choose a Guide Color and specify whether it is Locked so it cannot be moved with the mouse. Click Preview to see your guide on-screen before creating it, and then click OK.

The Guide Attributes dialog box

You can also display the Guide Attributes dialog box by double-clicking an existing guide in the layout.

  • To create guides automatically from the boundaries of a box, select the box and then choose Create Guides From Box from the palette menu. Use the Create Guides From Box controls to adjust the positions of the guides that will be placed at the Top, Bottom, Left, and Right sides of the box. The remaining controls work the same as those in the Guide Attributes dialog box.

The Create Guides From Box options for creating guides around the rectangular boundaries of a box of any shape.

Creating grids with the Guides palette

The Guides palette provides a quick method for creating a grid of evenly spaced guides on pages and spreads.

The Guides palette makes it easy to create a grid like this one

To create a grid on the active page or spread:

  1. Choose Create Grid from the Guides palette menu.

    Create Grid controls
  2. In the Gridlines area, check Horizontal and/or Vertical.

  3. If you want the guides to start at a specific location, for example within the margins, check the Start and/or End fields and then enter the distance from the page edges to start and end the guides.

  4. To create evenly spaced guides, choose Number and enter the number of guides you want in the field. To create guides that are a specific distance apart, choose Step and enter the distance in the field.

  5. Use the Type, Range, Color, View Scale, and Locked controls as you do in the Guide Attributes dialog box (see "Creating guides with the Guides palette").

  6. Click Preview to see the grid on-screen, and then click OK.

Creating rows and columns

The Guides palette lets you create evenly spaced rows and columns of guides with gutters. To create rows and columns of guides on the active page or spread:

  1. Choose Create Rows and Columns from the Guides palette menu.

    The Create Rows and Columns dialog box
  2. Enter the number of horizontal rows in the Rows field. If you want space between the rows, enter a value in the Gutter field.

  3. Enter the number of vertical columns in the Columns field. If you want space between the columns, enter a value in the Gutter field.

  4. To create guides inside the master guides, click Margins. Otherwise, leave Page Boundary selected.

  5. Use the Type, Range, Color, View Scale, and Locked controls as you do in the Guide Attributes dialog box (see "Creating guides with the Guides palette").

  6. Click Preview to see the guides on-screen, then click OK.

Creating bleed and safety guides

If you need bleed and/or safety guides, you can add them with the Guides palette rather than altering the page size or drawing your own guides.

Here, red bleed guides are placed 9 pts outside the page while green safety guides are placed 9 pts inside the page.

To create bleed and/or safety guides on the active page:

  1. Choose Create Bleed and Safety Guides from the Guides palette menu.

  2. For bleed guides, check Bleed, enter a value in the Gutter field to specify how far outside the page to place the guides, and then choose an option from the Color menu.

  3. For safety guides, check Safety, enter a value in the Gutter field to specify how far inside the page to place the guides, and then choose an option from the Color menu.

  4. Use the View Scale and Locked controls as you do in the Guide Attributes dialog box (see "Creating guides with the Guides palette").

  5. To apply the bleed and safety guides to multiple pages, use the Spread Range controls.

    You can add bleed and safety guides to master pages and layout pages.
  6. Click Preview to see the guides on-screen, and then click OK.

Scale functionality

Scale functionality lets you quickly scale QuarkXPress layouts, items, groups, and contents similar to the way drawing programs scale objects. Through the Scale Settings dialog box, you can specify what gets scaled — text, frames, offsets, line weights, and more.

Scale functionality can be found here:

  • Item > Scale lets you specify a new width, a new height, or both for the selected item, items, or group.

  • Window > Scale displays the Scale palette, which provides the same controls as the Scale command. In addition, the Scale palette lets you scale the entire layout. You can also scale the selected item, items, group, or layout up or down by 5% by choosing Increase Size or Decrease Size from the palette menu.

Scale dialog box and Scale palette

Both the Scale dialog box and the Scale palette offer the following features:

  • You can scale in terms of percentages of the item’s current size (percent), or by entering new dimensions (in current units of measurement). First, choose Percent or Units from the menus to the right of the Width and Height fields, and then enter appropriate values in the fields.

  • To scale items proportionally, click the Constrain button . When you constrain scaling, the Height option is unavailable and items will be scaled equally vertically and horizontally according to the entry in the Width field.

  • The Original and Scaled dimensions of the bounding box of the item or group are displayed (in current units of measurement). These values are updated whenever you change a value in the Width or Height fields.

  • To change scaling settings, click the Settings button in the Scale dialog box or choose Scale Settings from the Scale palette menu. The Adaptive Scaling dialog box displays. Each check box controls whether a particular item or attribute is scaled or not.

Adaptive Scaling dialog box

In the Scale palette, you can check Layout to scale the entire layout and everything in it.

Scaling allows you to scale an item so that it is smaller or larger than QuarkXPress allows. Such an item will print correctly, but if you attempt to modify it with QuarkXPress tools or commands, an error message will display.

Scaling is not designed to work with all items synchronized through the Content palette Window > Content). Instances of the shared item will inherit only width and height changes from scaling. In addition, do not scale entire layouts that include Composition Zones.

Rotated items are scaled according to their original geometry. For example, if you scale just the width of a square box that has been rotated 45 degrees, a rotated rectangle is produced (rather than, as you might have wanted, a wider diamond).

Cloner functionality

With Cloner funtionality, you can copy selected items to the same location on different pages or in a different project. You can also copy pages into a separate project.

To use Cloner, first select the items you want to clone, or deselect all items if you want to clone pages. Next, choose Utilities > Cloner to display the Cloner dialog box.

Cloner dialog box

The Clone Source area lets you choose what you want to clone. Click Selection to clone the selected items, or Pages to clone a range of pages (specified in terms of absolute position).

The Clone Destination area lets you choose where the cloned content goes. Choose an option from the Destination drop-down menu:

  • Current Layout: Copies the selected items to a different location in this layout.

  • Quark File: Copies the selected items or pages into an existing QuarkXPress project.

  • New Project: Copies the selected items or pages to a new QuarkXPress project.

  • New Layout: Copies the selected items or pages to a new layout in this QuarkXPress project.

  • Split to Single Pages: Creates a one-page project file from each page indicated.

  • Split Layouts to Projects: Creates a single-layout project from each layout in this project.

  • All Open Layouts: Copies the selected items to all layouts in this project.

  • [Layout name]: Copies the selected items or pages into that layout.

Enter the target page in the To Page field.

If you are cloning a selection, use the Copies field to enter the number of copies you want to make of the selected items. For example, if To Page is set to 2 and Copies is set to 5, copies will be created on pages 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. If you are working in a facing-page layout, the copies are placed on both sides of the spread.

If you are cloning pages, check Make section(s) to create sections in the page clones, then choose an option:

  • Keep contiguous: Keeps all of the page copies in a single layout in the destination layout, even if they originate from different sections.

  • Multiple sections: If the indicated page range includes section breaks, the section breaks are preserved in the copies.

If you are cloning into a new project or splitting into projects, check Copy style sheets to include all of the style sheets from the source layout in the new project or projects. If you do not check this box, only style sheets that are used are copied.

ImageGrid functionality

With ImageGrid functionality, you can automatically create a grid of images from a folder of image files.

A page created by ImageGrid

To use ImageGrid with the active layout, Choose Utilities > ImageGrid. The ImageGrid dialog box displays.

ImageGrid dialog box

To manually specify the size of the boxes that make up the grid, enter values in the Box Size fields and then click Fixed size. (Box size values are ignored if you click Autosize to.) Indicate the gap you want between images in the Gap field.

To specify how many rows and columns should be included in the grid and allow the application to size the boxes to fit automatically, click Autosize to and enter values in the rows and columns fields.

To automatically size boxes depending on their proportions, with the values in the Box size area as the maximum size, click Autofill pages using fixed size for limit.

Check Add picture info to add a caption text box under each picture box, indicating the picture file's name, resolution, dimensions in pixels, file format, and color space. To limit this caption to the name of the picture file, check Name only. To control the size of the caption text, check Info text size (if you don't check this box, the application uses font size specified in the Normal character style sheet).

To apply an automatic drop shadow to the picture boxes, check Apply Drop Shadow and enter a drop shadow offset in the Offset field.

The Box Shape controls let you specify the shape of the picture boxes. To use the default picture box attributes specified in the tool preferences (QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences > Tools tab), check Use Tool Preferences. If you do not check this box, the picture boxes will have a white background.

In the Picture Sizing area, choose one of the following options:

  • Import at: Lets you specify the scale at which pictures are imported. To also change the size of the box to fit the picture, check Fit box to picture. Note that this may override some of the settings in the New Box Sizing and Distribution area.

  • Fit proportionally to box: Fits the picture to the box proportionally.

  • Stretch to box: Fits the picture to the box non-proportionally.

Check Process subfolders to include pictures in subfolders of the target folder.

To choose the target folder and start the process, click Process Folder. To start the process with the currently selected target folder, click OK.

Linkster functionality

With Linkster functionality, you can link and unlink text boxes without causing reflow.

To use Linkster, first select the items you want to link or unlink. Next, choose Utilities > Linkster to display the Linkster dialog box.

Linkster dialog box

Click Selection to unlink the selected items, or Pages to unlink a range of pages (specified in terms of absolute position).

To unlink stories, click Unlink, then choose one of the following options:

  • Option 1 creates three stories: one for the boxes before the selected box, one for the selected box, and one for the boxes after the selected box.

  • Option 2 creates two stories: one for the boxes before and after the selected box, and one for the selected box.

  • Option 3 creates two stories: one for the boxes before the selected box, and one for the selected box and the boxes after the selected box.

  • Option 4 creates two stories: one for the boxes before the selected box and the selected box, and one for the boxes after the selected box.

To link text boxes, click Link. If Pages is selected, this option links only those boxes that have been unlinked by Linkster. If Selection is selected, Linkster tries to link the selected boxes in the order you selected them.

Click Keep text in same boxes to attempt to keep the text in the same boxes after linking.

By using the Link/Unlink tools, you can also apply many of the link options provided by Linkster.