A Guide to QuarkXPress 2018

Job Jackets

The Job Jackets feature takes a revolutionary step beyond preflighting: It helps to ensure that a print job adheres to its specifications from the moment it is created, and that it continues to adhere to those specifications all the way through until it rolls off the press. Furthermore, Job Jackets expand the concept of job specification enforcement beyond the realm of the individual user by linking projects to synchronized, dynamically updateable design specifications that include everything from style sheets and colors to page size and count.

Understanding Job Jackets

Job Jackets serve two main purposes:

  • To allow a job definer to create detailed specifications for Print and Digital layouts.

  • To allow a layout artist to create projects and layouts from those specifications, share the specifications with other layout artists, and verify that a layout follows its specifications.

Job Jackets were created because producing a layout and successfully sending it to output can be a complex task.

For example, consider some of the difficulties that have plagued creators of print layouts. Different presses have different capabilities, and modern page layout applications must be versatile enough to support all of those capabilities. Consequently, any number of things can go wrong, especially when you include the inevitable possibility of simple human error. Just to provide a few examples:

  • A layout artist may use colors or imported graphics that cannot be reproduced accurately on the target press.

  • A document that has been budgeted at 100 pages may be sent to output with a length of 112 pages.

  • A project may be sent to the output device without its required graphic files or fonts.

  • A layout with small text in a spot color may be sent to a four-color press, resulting in text that is unreadable.

  • Color management settings may be configured incorrectly for the output device, leading to unexpected results.

Large and complex print jobs provide even more opportunities for error, and the cost of such errors becomes much greater. Job Jackets prevent unprintable or incorrectly constructed jobs from being constructed in the first place.

What are Job Jackets?

Technically speaking, Job Jackets are XML structures that include specifications and rules for creating and inspecting QuarkXPress layouts. Conceptually, a Job Jackets structure can be compared to a folder containing job tickets that describe various types of projects and layouts, as well as other types of information.

Job Jackets are based on the latest version of the JDF (Job Definition Format) schema. In addition to letting you control QuarkXPress related specifications, Job Jackets also let you set values for various other specifications covered by JDF, such as binding and crossover settings. When you send a layout to output, you have the option of including the layout's JDF information, so that downstream systems can use that information for automation and for informational purposes. And the Job Jackets specification is extendable, so developers of JDF-compatible systems can embed their own implementation-specific settings into Job Jackets before passing the Job Jackets upstream to the layout artist. These settings can then be preserved in the Job Jackets file and used by XTensions software, by JDF-enabled applications, or by other systems, to automate and streamline a wide variety of processes.

Job Jackets can also help you to collaborate within a workgroup. Several layout artists working on layouts that share the same set of specifications can link their projects to a shared Job Jackets file, so that if one layout artist makes a change to something like a style sheet, the same change can be automatically propagated to the other artists' layouts.

The structure of Job Jackets

Job Jackets are XML structures containing specifications and rules. The topics below describe the way these specifications and rules are organized in Job Jackets.

Resources

Job Jackets contain Resources, which include the following:

  1. Project-level Resources: Things that can be applied to a particular project, such as style sheets, colors, output styles, and color management settings.

  2. Layout-level Resources: Things that can be applied to a particular layout, such as:

    • Layout Specifications: Settings that can be used to assign a particular size, orientation, and so forth to a layout.

    • Rules and Rule Sets: Tests that can be run to inspect a layout and verify its adherence to specifications.

    In addition to the Resources described above, Job Jackets can contain certain informational Resources, including the following:

    • Job Descriptions: This category includes a job number, revision, instructions, notes, and keywords.

    • Contacts: Contact information for job definers and others associated with the job. Adding contacts can make it easier to track down the appropriate person if something goes wrong with the job.

Job Tickets

The Resources in Job Jackets are organized into one or more Job Tickets. Each Job Ticket contains a set of particular Resources that can be applied to a QuarkXPress project.

Within a Job Ticket, Resources are grouped as follows:

  1. Project settings: A set of project-level Resources that can be applied to a single project. Project settings include things like style sheets, colors, output styles, and color management settings. Each Job Ticket contains one set of project settings.

  2. Layout definitions: Sets of layout-level Resources, each of which can be applied to a single layout. Each Job Ticket can contain zero or more layout definitions. Each layout definition can include the following:

    • A Layout Specification (page size, orientation, and so forth)

    • Zero or more Output Specifications (configurations for a particular output device)

    • Zero or more Rule Sets (for inspecting the layout)

    • A medium type (Print or Digital)

    • Color management settings (Source Setup and Output Setup)

    • Proofing specifications (Proof Output and Proof Intent)

    • Informational Resources (Description, Job Description, and Instructions)

    Resources are defined and stored in a Job Jackets structure. A Job Ticket contains a set of project settings for a particular type of project and layout definitions for zero or more layouts. Note that Resource definitions do not "live" in Job Tickets; Job Tickets refer or "point" to Resource definitions, which live in the Job Jackets structure.
Job Tickets and Job Ticket templates

There are three kinds of Job Tickets:

  • A Job Ticket template is a definition for a "master" Job Ticket. In some ways, a Job Ticket template is similar to a master page or a QuarkXPress template file.

  • An active Job Ticket is a copy of a Job Ticket template that is associated with a particular project.

  • A deferred Job Ticket is a copy of a Job Ticket template that has been associated with a project, but is no longer associated with that project (for example, if the project was closed without being saved).

A Job Jackets file can contain Job Ticket templates (containing definitions for Job Tickets), active Job Tickets (which are associated with a particular project), and deferred Job Tickets (which have been associated with a project, but are no longer associated with that project).

Each Job Ticket template can be used to generate Job Tickets for one or more projects. Each Job Ticket can apply to only one project. When a Job Ticket is applied to a project, the Resources in that Job Ticket become available in the project (for example, the project inherits all of the color, style sheet, and layout definitions listed in the Job Ticket).

There are two ways to apply a Job Ticket to a project:

  • When creating the project, choose File > New > Project from Ticket, and then select a Job Ticket template. QuarkXPress copies the Job Ticket template's information into a new Job Ticket for the new project. The new project automatically contains a pre-configured layout for each of the layout definitions in the Job Ticket template, plus all of the project settings defined in the Job Ticket template.

  • Create or open an existing project, and then choose File > Job Jackets > Link Project and select a Job Ticket template. Again, QuarkXPress copies the Job Ticket template's information into a new Job Ticket for this particular project. The project acquires all of the project settings defined in the Job Ticket template, and a new pre-configured layout is created for each of the layout definitions in the Job Ticket template.

A Job Ticket maintains no link to the Job Ticket template from which it was created. Changes made to a Job Ticket template are not propagated to existing Job Tickets.

Linked and embedded Job Jackets

Every QuarkXPress project is associated with a Job Jackets structure. A project's Job Jackets structure may be embedded in the project, or it may be stored in an XML Job Jackets file in the local file system. The location of a project's Job Jackets structure depends on how you create the project; for more information, see "Applying a Job Ticket template to a project."

A Job Jackets structure can exist as an XML file in the file system, or can be embedded in the project file.

By default, non-embedded Job Jackets files are stored in the location specified in the Job Jackets pane of the Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit menu). However, you can store Job Jackets files wherever you like. For example, if you're sharing a Job Jackets file among layout artists in a workgroup, you might choose to put that Job Jackets file on a file server that everyone can reach through the network.

To change the default location where Job Jackets are stored, go to the Job Jackets pane of the Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit menu), click Select the path, click the Select button, and navigate to the target directory.

Sample Job Jackets workflow

This topic describes a suggested workflow for Job Jackets. Note that this is not the only possible workflow; it is just an example to show how Job Jackets can be used. The following definitions are used:

  • Job definer: The person who knows what the print job is supposed to consist of — for example, number of pages, size, colors, and so forth.

  • Output specialist: The person who knows how a print job must be created and configured to print correctly on the target press.

  • Layout artist: The person who actually creates the layout in QuarkXPress.

The intended workflow for Job Jackets is as follows:

  1. An output specialist and a job definer work together to define the output specifications and rules that are appropriate for a print job (or for a set of related print jobs), including things like page size, page count, list of colors, trapping settings, style sheets, line thicknesses, and valid color spaces for imported pictures.

  2. The job definer uses these specifications and rules to create a Job Ticket template in a Job Jackets file. The Job Ticket template describes a particular project, and may include different specifications and rules for each layout in that project (here, we'll assume only one layout is defined in the Job Ticket template). When the Job Jackets file is complete, the job definer gives the file to the layout artist.

  3. The layout artist creates a project from the Job Ticket template using the command File > New > Project from Ticket. QuarkXPress automatically creates a Job Ticket from the Job Ticket template, and associates the Job Ticket with the project. QuarkXPress reads the Job Ticket and automatically inserts all of the Job Ticket's Resources into the project (such as colors, style sheets, and color management settings). QuarkXPress also automatically creates any layouts defined in the Job Ticket.

  4. Using the Job Ticket as a set of guidelines, the layout artist builds the layout. Periodically, the layout artist chooses File > Job Jackets > Evaluate Layout to verify that she is staying within the guidelines defined in the Job Ticket. When she does so, a dialog box lets her identify and navigate to any design elements that violate the rules defined in the Job Ticket. This lets the layout artist fix problems as they arise, rather than leaving them to be found at prepress.

  5. When a layout is complete, the layout artist sends it to output through any of several methods, including direct printing, Collect for Output, or export to PDF or PDF/X. If the Job Jackets file includes Output Specifications, those Output Specifications can be used to send the job to output to specific formats and with specific settings. Because the layout has been developed within the specifications provided by the Job Ticket template, the layout is correct when it arrives at the press.

Working with Job Jackets

Job Jackets information is stored in XML format. However, QuarkXPress provides a comprehensive interface that makes it easy to create and modify Job Jackets. The following topics describe the basics of the Job Jackets user interface.

Basic mode and Advanced mode

 

Basic Mode is only available on Windows.

The Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities > Job Jackets Manager) provides a unified interface where a job definer can create and configure Job Jackets and the components that they are made of.

By default, the Job Jackets Manager dialog box shows the Job Jackets in the default Job Jackets folder (see "The default Job Jackets file"), as well as the Job Jackets associated with any open projects. The active project (if any) is shown in bold with an asterisk.

The Job Jackets Manager dialog box has two modes:

  • (Windows only) Basic mode is for layout artists and job definers who don't need to use the advanced JDF capabilities of Job Jackets. Basic mode offers all the controls necessary to create, manage, and share Job Jackets.

  • Advanced mode is for production administrators seeking to use the features of JDF to automate and integrate portions of their workflow. Advanced mode uses a different user interface that provides access to everything in basic mode plus additional Resources, such as Rules, and JDF-only Resources, such as binding and crossover specifications.

(Windows only) To use advanced mode, open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu) and click the Advanced Settings button. To switch back to basic mode, click the Basic Settings button.

The Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities > Job Jackets Manager) lets a job definer work with Job Jackets files and their components. This dialog box has a basic mode (top) and an advanced mode (bottom).

Creating Job Jackets files

First of all, when and why should a job definer create a Job Jackets file? There are no hard-and-fast rules for answering this question: If you want to, you can put Job Tickets for all of your print jobs in one great big Job Jackets file. However, here are some guidelines to indicate when you might want to have separate Job Jackets files.

  • If you plan to create a number of print jobs that share the same Resources (such as colors, style sheets, trapping settings, color management settings, and page sizes), you might want to create one Job Jackets file for all of those print jobs. For example, if you're a design firm that serves several different clients, each of which has its own visual identity, you might create one Job Jackets file for each client.

  • If you are in charge of a design group and you'd like to make sure that every layout artist working on a particular project (such as a promotional campaign) uses the exact same Resources, you might want to create a Job Jackets file and Job Ticket template containing those Resources, and have all of the layout artists share that Job Jackets file.

  • If you are an output provider and you have a particular press with particular requirements, you might create a Job Jackets file that captures that press's requirements for your customers (and thus helps them to avoid exceeding those requirements). You might even be able to download a Job Jackets file containing a press's requirements from the press manufacturer.

Creating a Job Jackets file: Basic mode (Windows only)

To create a Job Jackets file using basic mode:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities > Job Jackets Manager).

  2. If more than one list displays in the dialog box, click Basic Settings to show the basic pane.

  3. Click the New Job Jackets button . The New Job Jackets dialog box displays.

  4. Enter a name for the Job Jackets file in the Name field.

  5. If you plan to allow multiple users to share this Job Jackets file, check Share this Jacket. If you do not check this box, the Job Jackets file will be embedded in the active project (if any).

  6. If you checked Share this Jacket in the previous step, specify where the Job Jackets file should be stored by choosing an option from the Save in drop-down menu:

    • To use the default location (see "Linked and embedded Job Jackets"), choose Default Jacket Folder.

    • To store the shared Job Jackets file in the same folder as the active project, choose Project Folder.

    • To store the shared Job Jackets file somewhere else, choose Other and browse to a target directory (such as a networked volume available to all of the layout artists).

  7. Click the Settings control to show the Tickets, Style Settings, Contacts, and Layout Specification tabs.

    The New Job Jackets dialog box lets you add Resources to a new Job Jackets file.
  8. Use the Tickets tab to add Job Ticket templates to the Job Jackets file. For more information, see "Creating a Job Ticket template: Basic mode."

  9. Use the Style Settings tab to add Resources to the Job Jackets file. You can append project-level Resources from a variety of sources using the Append From option:

    • To append Resources from the application defaults, click Application.

    • To append Resources from a project file or from another Job Jackets file, click Other, and then click Select and navigate to the target file.

    To copy Resources to the Job Ticket template, use the three lists at the bottom of the dialog box. Choose a type of Resource from the first list, and then choose specific Resources in the second list and click the button to copy those Resources into the third list (which shows the Resources of this type in the Job Ticket template).

    To remove Resources from the Job Jackets file, choose a type of Resource from the first list, and then choose specific Resources in the third list, and click the Remove button.

  10. Contacts can make it easy for anyone who works with a QuarkXPress file to get in touch with the job definer if problems arise. To add JDF contact information to the Job Jackets file, click the Contacts tab, and then click the New Item button to add a contact. Click the expander next to the new contact to expose its fields, and then fill in the details for each field.

  11. A Layout Specification lets you set attributes like page size and page count for automatically generated layouts. To add a Layout Specification to the Job Jackets file, click the Layout Specification tab, and then click the New Item button to add a Layout Specification. Click the expander next to the new Layout Specification to expose its fields, and then fill in the details for each field.

  12. Click OK.

Creating a Job Jackets file: Advanced mode

To create a Job Jackets file using advanced mode:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

  2. If only one list displays in the dialog box, click Advanced Settings to show the advanced pane.

  3. Click the New Job Jackets button . The New Job Jackets dialog box displays.

  4. Enter a name for the Job Jackets file, navigate to the target directory, and click Save. If you plan to allow multiple layout artists to access the same Job Jackets file, you may want to choose a directory where all of the layout artists can access the Job Jackets file over the network.

  5. Add Resources to the Job Jackets file, as described in "Adding Resources to a Job Jackets file: Advanced mode."

Adding Resources to a Job Jackets file: Advanced mode

The following procedure is useful if you want to create a Job Jackets file using the Resources in an existing project. For example, if you have last year's copy of a brochure project, and you'd like to put all of the brochure project's style sheets, colors, and so forth into a new Job Jackets file, you can do so with this procedure. You can also use this procedure to copy Resources from one Job Jackets file to another.

To add Resources to a Job Jackets file using advanced mode:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

  2. If only one list displays in the dialog box, click Advanced Settings to show the advanced pane.

  3. Specify where you want to copy Resources from:

    • To copy Resources from a Job Jackets structure, Job Ticket template, or Job Ticket, select the source item in the list on the left.

    • To copy Resources from an open project, select the project in the list on the left.

    • To copy Resources from the application defaults, click the Load Application Resources button .

  4. Select a Resource category in the list on the top right.

  5. Drag and drop individual Resources from the list on the bottom right to the target Job Jackets icon in the list on the left.

You can also drag Resources to a Job Ticket or project.

For information about changing the locations of Resources in a Job Ticket, see "Specifying the location of Resources: Advanced mode."

Working with Job Tickets

A Job Ticket is a set of Resources (specifications and rules) that can be applied to one or more QuarkXPress projects. Each Job Ticket has a name and is stored in a particular Job Jackets structure. A Job Ticket contains both project-level Resources (such as colors, style sheets, and color management settings) and layout-level Resources (such as Layout Specifications and layout definitions).

There are three kinds of Job Tickets:

  • A Job Ticket template is a definition for a "master" Job Ticket. In some ways, a Job Ticket template is similar to a master page or a QuarkXPress template file.

  • An active Job Ticket is a copy of a Job Ticket template that is associated with a particular project.

  • A deferred Job Ticket is a copy of a Job Ticket template that has been associated with a project, but is no longer associated with that project (for example, if the project was closed without being saved).

Creating a Job Ticket template

Here are some guidelines to indicate when you might want to have separate Job Ticket templates:

  • If you have a recurring print job, such as a newsletter or magazine, you might want to create a Job Ticket template for that job.

  • If you plan to create several types of layouts (such as a poster, postcard, and digital medium) that are all based on a single campaign or theme, you might want to create a Job Ticket template for each layout and store all of the Job Ticket templates in a single Job Jackets file. That way, all of the layouts can share the same style sheets, colors, and so forth.

  • If you have a standard format that is used by a number of people, such as an ad format, you might want to use a Job Ticket template to help your customers construct their ads according to the guidelines.

  • If a group of layout artists needs to ensure that they are all using the same style sheets, colors, or other Resources, and to keep those Resources synchronized among the layout artists if the Resources should change, you might want to store those Resources in a Job Ticket template so the layout artists can access the Resources via a shared Job Jackets file. This approach can help you to maintain corporate brand standards in a large organization.

Creating a Job Ticket template: Basic mode (Windows only)

To add a Job Ticket template to a Job Jackets structure using basic mode:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities > Job Jackets Manager). If more than one list displays in the dialog box, click Basic Settings to show the basic pane.

    You can create Job Ticket templates in the basic pane of the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).
  2. Select the Job Jackets structure that will contain the Job Ticket template.

  3. Click the New Ticket Template button . The New Job Ticket dialog box displays.

    You can assign Resources to a new Job Ticket template in the New Job Ticket dialog box.
  4. Configure the new Job Ticket template as described in "Working with Resources in a Job Ticket: Basic mode."

Editing a Job Ticket: basic mode (Windows only)

To edit a project's active Job Ticket, open the project and then choose File > Job Jackets > Modify Job Ticket. The Edit Job Ticket dialog box displays. For information on how to use the Edit Job Ticket dialog box, see "Working with Resources in a Job Ticket: Basic mode."

Working with Resources in a Job Ticket: Basic mode (Windows only)

This topic describes how to add and remove Resources in a Job Ticket or Job Ticket template using the New Job Ticket or Edit Job Ticket dialog box. These two dialog boxes are basically the same, except that the Edit Job Ticket dialog box looks slightly different for Job Tickets than it does for Job Ticket templates.

You can add Resources to a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket in the New Job Ticket and Edit Job Ticket dialog boxes.

To assign Resources using the New Job Ticket or Edit Job Ticket dialog box:

  1. To add or remove project-level Resources, use the controls on the Style Settings tab (for Job Ticket templates) or the Project Settings tab (for active and deferred Job Tickets).

    You can append project-level Resources from a variety of sources using the Append From drop-down menu:

    • To append Resources from the Job Ticket's parent Job Jackets structure, choose Current Jacket.

    • To append Resources from the active project, choose Current Linked Project.

    • To append Resources from the application defaults, choose Application.

    • To append Resources from a project file or from a Job Jackets file, choose Other, and then click Select and navigate to the target file.

    To copy Resources to the Job Ticket, use the three lists at the bottom of the dialog box. Choose a type of Resource from the first list, then choose specific Resources in the second list, and click the right-facing arrow to copy those Resources into the third list (which shows the Resources of this type in the Job Ticket).

    To remove Resources from the Job Ticket, choose a type of Resource from the first list, then choose specific Resources in the third list, and click the left-facing arrow.

  2. The presence of a layout definition means that QuarkXPress will automatically create a layout when this Job Ticket is applied to a project. When creating a layout definition, you can specify a Layout Specification (with information such as page size and page count), a Medium Type (Print, Digital), Rule Sets, and Output Specifications.

    To add a layout definition to the Job Ticket, click the Layout Settings tab, then click the button; a layout definition is added to the list.

    To configure the selected layout definition, first click the Layout Properties control to display the layout property controls, then:

    • To name the layout definition, enter a name in the Layout Name field. This name will be applied to the automatically generated layout.

    • To specify information such as page size and page count for the layout definition, choose an option from the Layout Specification drop-down menu. (Note that a Layout Specification must be present in the Job Jackets structure before you can choose the Layout Specification here; see "Creating Job Jackets" for more information.)

    • To indicate what type of layout should be created automatically for this layout definition, choose an option from the Medium Type drop-down menu.

    • To copy Rule Sets and Output Specifications from the parent Job Jackets structure to the layout definition, use the three lists at the bottom of the dialog box. Choose a type of Resource from the first list, then choose specific Resources in the second list, and click the button to copy those Resources into the third list (which shows the Resources of this type in the layout definition).

    To delete a layout definition, select it and click the button.

  3. When you are finished configuring the Job Ticket, click OK.

Creating a Job Ticket template: Advanced mode

To add a Job Ticket template to a Job Jackets structure using advanced mode:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities > Job Jackets Manager). If only one list displays in the dialog box, click Advanced Settings to show the advanced pane.

  2. To indicate where the new Job Ticket template should be stored, create or select a Job Jackets icon in the left list.

  3. Click the New Ticket template button . A Job Ticket template is added to the selected Job Jackets structure.

  4. Configure the new Job Ticket template as described in "Working with Resources in a Job Ticket: Advanced mode."

Working with Resources in a Job Ticket: Advanced mode

You might need to work with a Job Ticket's Resources in several situations:

  • You can use this procedure if you want to create a Job Ticket template using the Resources in an existing project. For example, if you have last year's copy of a brochure project, and you'd like to put all of the brochure project's style sheets, colors, and so forth into a new Job Ticket template, or into an existing project's active Job Ticket, you can do so with this procedure.

  • You can use this procedure to copy Resources from one Job Ticket to another.

  • You can use this procedure to copy Resources from a Job Jackets structure or a project to a Job Ticket.

To add Resources to a Job Jackets structure using advanced mode:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

  2. If only one list displays in the dialog box, click Advanced Settings to show the advanced pane.

  3. Specify where you want to copy Resources from:

    • To copy Resources from a Job Jackets structure, Job Ticket template, or Job Ticket, select the source item in the list on the top left.

    • To copy Resources from an open project, select the project in the list on the left.

    • To copy Resources from the application defaults, click the Load Application Resources button .

  4. Select a Resource category in the list on the top right.

  5. Drag and drop individual Resources from the list on the bottom right to the target Job Ticket template or Job Ticket in the list on the left.

Adding a layout definition to a Job Ticket: Advanced mode

A layout definition is a group of specifications that combine to describe a single layout. A layout definition includes Resources such as medium (output) type (Print, Digital), Output Specifications, and Rule Sets.

When you create a project from a Job Ticket template, QuarkXPress automatically creates a layout for each layout definition in the Job Ticket template. If a layout definition does not contain a Layout Specification, QuarkXPress displays the New Project dialog box so you can specify the page size, margins, and so forth.

When you add a layout definition to an active Job Ticket, a layout is created from that layout definition and automatically added to the corresponding project.

To add a layout definition to a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities > Job Jackets Manager) and select the target Job Ticket in the left list.

  2. To display Resource controls, click the Advanced Settings button.

  3. Select Layouts in the top-right list. Any layout definitions in the Job Ticket display in the bottom-right list.

  4. Click the New Item button above the bottom-right list. A layout definition named "Layouts" is added. (The name you give to a layout definition is the name that will be applied to the actual layout when you create a project. To rename a layout definition, double-click its name and then enter the new name.)

  5. Click the expander button next to the layout definition name to display the fields of the layout definition.

  6. Specify or enter a value for any fields you want to use.

  7. Click Save.

For information on using layout definitions, see "Applying a layout definition to a project."

Applying a Job Ticket template to a project

You can apply a Job Ticket template to a project in two ways:

  • Create a project from the Job Ticket template.

  • Link an existing project to a Job Ticket template.

In either case, a Job Ticket is created from the Job Ticket template, and the new Job Ticket instance is applied to the new project. The topics below describe both approaches.

Creating a project from a Job Ticket template

When you create a project from a Job Ticket template, QuarkXPress always creates a Job Ticket from that Job Ticket template. You can choose where that Job Ticket is stored: In a shared Job Jackets file, or in an embedded Job Jackets structure in the project file.

To create a project from a Job Ticket template:

  1. Choose File > New > Project from Ticket. The New Project from Ticket dialog box displays.

    Use the New Project from Ticket dialog box to select a Job Ticket template for a new project.
  2. If the Job Jackets structure you want is not displayed, click Browse, navigate to the Job Jackets file, and then click Open.

  3. Select the target Job Ticket template in the list. (Note that you can also select a deferred Job Ticket.)

  4. Check or uncheck the Share Jacket check box, as follows:

    • To store this project's active Job Ticket in an external Job Jackets file, so the Job Ticket can share Resources with other users of that Job Jackets file, check Share Jacket.

    • To store this project's Job Ticket in an embedded Job Jackets structure in the project file, uncheck Share Jacket.

  5. Click Select. The new project inherits the Job Ticket template's project settings, and QuarkXPress automatically creates layouts for any layout definitions in the Job Ticket template.

You cannot store a Job Ticket in the default Job Jackets structure. Consequently, if you create a project from a Job Ticket template that is in the default Job Jackets structure, and you check Share Jacket, you will be prompted to save a new Job Jackets file in the file system.

Linking an existing project to a Job Jackets file

When you link an existing project to a Job Jackets file, you remove the project's current active Job Ticket and link the project to a new Job Ticket created from a Job Ticket template in another Job Jackets file. You might choose to do this if, for example, you want to link an existing project to a Job Jackets file where another layout artist has an active Job Ticket, and thus synchronize some or all of the Resources that the two of you are using.

To apply a Job Ticket to an existing project:

  1. Create or open the project.

  2. Choose File > Job Jackets > Link Project. The Link Project dialog box displays.

  3. If the Job Jackets file you want is not displayed, click Browse, navigate to the file, and then click Open.

  4. Select the target Job Ticket template in the list.

  5. Check or uncheck the Share Jacket check box, as follows:

    • To store this project's Job Ticket in the Job Jackets file containing the target Job Ticket template, check Share Jacket.

    • To store this project's Job Ticket in an embedded Job Jackets structure in the project file, uncheck Share Jacket.

  6. Click Attach. The project inherits the Job Ticket template's project settings, and layouts are automatically created for any layout definitions in the Job Ticket template.

If you use a Job Ticket template in the default Job Jackets structure, and you check Share Jacket, you will be prompted to save a new Job Jackets file in the file system. This is because you cannot store a Job Ticket in the default Job Jackets structure.

Viewing Job Ticket relationships

You can see the relationships between Job Jackets, Job Ticket templates, Job Tickets, and projects in the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu). The icons shown in this dialog box are as follows:

  • Job Jackets structure (linked)

  • Job Jackets structure (embedded)

  • Job Ticket template

  • Active or deferred Job Ticket

  • Project (a bold project name indicates the active project)

A project that is linked to an active Job Ticket is displayed like this:

A project that is linked to an active Job Ticket

A deferred Job Ticket has a icon, but is not linked to a project. This may mean that the project was moved, deleted, or never saved.

Applying a layout definition to a project

A layout definition provides a group of settings that combine to describe a layout. These settings can include a medium type (Print, Digital), Rule Sets, Output Setups, and a color management Source Setup. A layout definition also can include a Layout Specification, which includes information such as page size and page count (note that Layout Specifications must be created at the Job Jackets level).

When you associate a project with a Job Ticket template, QuarkXPress automatically creates a layout for each layout definition in that Job Ticket template. Such layouts have the same names as the layout definitions they were based on.

You can apply a layout definition to a project in two ways:

Whichever approach you use, the defined layouts are created automatically.

Exporting and importing Job Tickets

There may be situations in which a job definer needs to copy a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket from one Job Jackets file to another, or to import all of a Job Jackets structure's Job Ticket templates and Job Tickets into another Job Jackets structure. You can do both of these things with the Job Ticket export and import features.

Exporting a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket

To export a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket from a Job Jackets structure:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu) and select the target Job Ticket (or Job Tickets) in the left list.

  2. Click the Export Ticket button above the left list. The New Job Jackets dialog box displays.

  3. Specify a name and location and click Save. All selected Job Tickets are saved into a Job Jackets file with the indicated file name, along with any Resources they require.

Importing a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket

To import a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket into a Job Jackets structure:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu) and select the target Job Jackets icon in the left list.

  2. Click the Import button above the left list. The Select Job Jackets File dialog box displays.

  3. Select a Job Jackets file and click Open. All Job Ticket templates and Job Tickets in the selected file are imported into the selected Job Jackets structure, along with any Resources they require.

The default Job Jackets file

When QuarkXPress is installed, a default Job Jackets file (containing a default Job Ticket template) named "DefaultJacket.xml" is installed as well in the location specified in the Job Jackets pane of the Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit menu).

When you create a project by choosing File > New > Project, the following things happen:

  • QuarkXPress makes a copy of this default Job Jackets file (named "Default Job Jackets") and embeds it in the new project. The embedded Job Jackets structure is named "[filename] Job Jackets."

  • In the embedded Job Jackets structure, QuarkXPress creates a Job Ticket from the default Job Ticket template (named "Default Job Ticket"). The new Job Ticket is named "[filename] Ticket."

  • QuarkXPress associates the Job Ticket in the embedded Job Jackets structure with the new project.

You can use the default Job Jackets file to control the Resources that are used in new QuarkXPress projects. You can also edit the default Job Ticket template that is used by projects created via File > New > Project. This topic explains both procedures.

You cannot store a new Job Ticket in the default Job Jackets file. For more information, see "Creating a project from a Job Ticket template."

Editing the default Job Ticket template: File menu

The default Job Ticket template is used by projects created using File > New > Project. There are two ways to edit the default Job Ticket template.

To edit the default Job Ticket template from the File menu:

  1. Close any open projects.

  2. To open the default Job Ticket template in the Modify Job Ticket dialog box, choose File > Job Jackets > Modify Job Ticket.

  3. Use the controls in the Modify Job Ticket dialog box to configure the default Job Ticket template, and then click OK.

Editing the default Job Ticket template: Utilities menu

To edit the default Job Ticket template from the Job Jackets Manager dialog box:

  1. Display the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

  2. Click the Open Jacket button, navigate to the default Job Jackets file, and click Open.

  3. Expand the default Job Jackets structure and select the Job Ticket template named "Default Job Ticket" in the list.

  4. Click the Edit button . The Edit Job Ticket dialog box displays.

  5. Use the controls in the Edit Job Ticket dialog box to configure the default Job Ticket template.

  6. Click OK.

The next project you create using File > New > Project will use the modified default Job Ticket template.

Editing the default Job Jackets file

You can use the default Job Jackets file to control the Resources that are used in new QuarkXPress projects. To edit the default Job Jackets file:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

  2. Click the Open Jacket button , navigate to the default Job Jackets file, and click Open.

  3. Select the Job Jackets structure named "Default Job Jackets" in the list.

  4. Use the controls in the Job Jackets Manager dialog box to configure the default Job Jackets structure, and then click OK.

For information on working with Resources, see "Working with Resources: Advanced mode."

Working with Resources: Advanced mode

"Resources" is a generic category that describes most of the components that make up Job Jackets and Job Tickets. Resources include everything from style sheets to page size specifications. The topics below describe how to access, create, and update Resources in the advanced pane of the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

Job definers will use this procedure often, for various purposes. Layout artists, however, may never need to use this procedure at all.

Accessing Resources: Advanced mode

Before you can work with a Resource, you have to be able to get to it. To access a Resource:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

  2. If only one list displays in the dialog box, click Advanced Settings to show the Advanced pane.

  3. In the list on the left, open or create a Job Jackets file. The Resource categories in the Job Jackets file are listed in alphabetical order in the list on the upper right.

  4. To work with Resources that are specific to a Job Jackets structure, select the target Job Jackets structure in the list on the left. Note that Resource categories that are unavailable represent Resources that must be specified at the Job Ticket level.

  5. To work with Resources that are specific to a Job Ticket, expand the Job Jackets structure; create , duplicate , or import a Job Ticket; and then make sure the target Job Ticket is selected in the list on the left. Note that dimmed Resource categories represent Resources that must be specified at the Job Jackets level.

  6. Select a Resource type in the top-right list. Existing Resources of the selected type are listed in the bottom-right list.

    Use the Job Jackets Manager dialog box to view, create, duplicate, delete, import, and export Resources.

Configuring Resources: Advanced mode

Once you've navigated to a Resource in the Job Jackets Manager dialog box, you can configure that Resource. Different options are available for different types of Resources in this dialog box:

  • You can specify a location for most Resources.

  • You can delete most Resources.

  • You can create and modify some types of Resources, but others must be created and modified using other parts of the QuarkXPress user interface.

  • You can create, duplicate, delete, and configure layout definitions, Output Specifications, Layout Specifications, Job Descriptions, Contacts, Rules, and Rule Sets in a Job Jackets structure.

In Job Jackets, App Studio layouts are represented by Digital layout resources.

If a Resource permits it, you can create and configure that Resource in the Job Jackets Manager dialog box as follows:

  1. To create a Resource of the type selected in the top-right list, click the New Item button in the bottom-right list. To rename the Resource, click its name.

  2. If a Resource has an expander icon, click that icon to expand the Resource, and then configure the fields that are revealed. Some Resource fields include drop-down menus, while others allow you to enter values manually.

  3. If a Resource has a button, click that button to create additional instances of the Resource. For example, when creating a Layout Specification, you can click this button on the Spot Color Resource to create additional spot colors.

Specifying the location of Resources: Advanced mode

Resources can exist in several locations:

  • In Jacket: Stored in a Job Jackets structure, but not used in any of that Job Jackets structure's Job Ticket templates or Job Tickets.

  • In Ticket: Stored in a Job Jackets structure and associated with a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket. If an "In Ticket" Resource is in a Job Ticket template that is associated with a project, that Resource is also available in the project.

  • In Project: Stored in a project, but NOT associated with a Job Jackets structure or Job Ticket.

You can specify the location of Resources as follows:

  1. Access a Resource using the Job Jackets Manager dialog box, as described in "Accessing Resources: Advanced mode."

  2. Select the Resource in the bottom-right list.

  3. Choose a location from the drop-down menu in the Status column:

    • If the item selected in the left list is a Job Jackets structure, you can choose only In Jacket.

    • If the item selected in the left list is a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket, you can specify whether or not the Resource is associated with that Job Ticket template or Job Ticket by choosing In Jacket or In Ticket.

    • If the item selected in the left list is a project, you can specify whether the Resource is defined only in the project (Status = In Project) or uses the definition in the project's active Job Ticket (Status = In Ticket).

    Use the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu) to specify where Resources are stored.

Working with Layout Specifications

A Layout Specification lets you define layout-specific information such as page size, page count, margins, spread information, bleed information, binding information, and so forth.

The standard procedure for working with Layout Specifications is:

  1. Create a Layout Specification (see "Creating a Layout Specification: Advanced mode"). This part of the job is typically done by a job definer.

  2. Associate the Layout Specification with a layout using a Job Ticket template or Job Ticket. This is typically done by the layout artist.

The topics below describe each of the above procedures in detail.

Creating a Layout Specification: Advanced mode

Layout Specifications are Resources, and thus must be created in the Job Jackets Manager dialog box, as described in "Working with Resources: Advanced mode."

You can use the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu) to create Layout Specifications.

Applying a Layout Specification to a layout

You can associate a Layout Specification with a layout in two ways: by creating the layout from a Job Ticket template, or by applying the Layout Specification to an existing layout's active Job Ticket.

A job definer will typically add a Layout Specification to a layout definition in a Job Jackets file before the actual project and layout are created. Because a Layout Specification is a Resource, you add it to a layout definition just as you would any other Resource (see "Working with Resources: Advanced mode").

To configure a Job Ticket template to automatically create a layout that follows a particular Layout Specification, associate the Layout Specification with the layout definition using the Job Jackets Manager dialog box.

A layout artist can apply a Layout Specification to a layout's active Job Ticket after the project and layout are created using the Edit Job Ticket dialog box (File > Job Jackets > Modify Job Ticket). To add a Layout Specification to an active Job Ticket, click the Layout Settings tab, select the layout in the layout list, and choose an option from the Layout Specs drop-down menu.

You can use the Edit Job Ticket dialog box (File > Job Jackets > Modify Job Ticket) to assign a Layout Specification to a layout in the active project.

Working with Rules and Rule Sets

A Rule is a test that is executed against the active layout when you choose File > Job Jackets > Evaluate Layout.

Each Rule can test one condition. For example, a Rule might state that all text characters should be set to overprint. Rules also can include descriptions, policies (to indicate to the layout artist whether a given condition is mandatory, recommended, or forbidden), and instructions for fixing problem situations.

The standard procedure for working with Rules and Rule Sets is:

  1. Create Rules (see "Creating Rules: Advanced mode") and add them to a Rule Set (see "Adding Rules to a Rule Set: Advanced mode"). This is typically done by a job definer, possibly working with an output specialist.

  2. Associate the Rule Set with a layout using a Job Ticket template (see "Applying a Rule Set to a layout"). This is typically done by the job definer.

  3. Use the Rule Set to evaluate the layout (see "Evaluating a layout"). This is typically done by a layout artist.

The following topics describe each of the above procedures in detail.

Creating Rules: Advanced mode

To construct a Rule, first navigate to the Rule Resources in the Job Jackets Manager dialog box, as described in "Working with Resources: Advanced mode." Then use the Rule wizard, as follows:

  1. Click the New button . The Edit Rule dialog box (the first part of the Rule wizard) displays.

  2. Enter a name for the Rule in the Name field.

  3. To indicate what kind of object the Rule should apply to, choose an option from the Subject drop-down menu. Available subjects include all boxes, text boxes, picture boxes, text characters, lines, text paths, pictures, and fonts.

     

    Use the Edit Rule dialog box to create rules.
  4. To indicate what you want the Rule to check, check an option in the Conditions area. The available conditions depend on the selected subject.

    Repeat this step for each condition you want to include in the Rule. The conditions are combined with a logical AND operator. For example, to create a Rule specifying that text boxes should have a background of 50% Blue, choose Text Boxes and then check both Background and Shade.

  5. Click Next to display the next dialog box in the Rule wizard. In this dialog box, you must specify the conditions that trigger the Rule (for example, "is not Overprint" or "is less than 10pt"). To configure each condition, click the expander to expand the item in the list, then choose options and enter values in the provided fields.

     

    Use the second dialog box in the Rule wizard to configure a rule.

    If a condition has a button, you can click this button to add additional clauses to the condition. Clauses are combined with a logical OR operator. For example, to specify that the indicated item should have a color that is either a CMYK color or a spot color, configure the first line to check for CMYK, then add a second line, and configure it to check for Spot Ink.

  6. Click Next to display the third and final dialog box in the Rule wizard. Use this dialog box to specify a Description of the Rule, a Policy (which determines what kind of icon displays if the Rule is broken), and Instructions for fixing the problem. The information you enter in Instructions is displayed when a layout artist chooses Evaluate Layout if the Rule is broken.

    Use the third dialog box in the Rule wizard to control what happens when a rule is broken.

Adding Rules to a Rule Set: Advanced mode

Rules must be put into Rule Sets, which are named collections of Rules. A job definer can include one or more Rule Sets in a layout definition in a Job Ticket template. A layout artist working in a layout that is based on that layout definition can then evaluate the layout using the Rules in those Rule Sets (see "Evaluating a layout"). To add a Rule to a Rule Set:

  1. Open the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu).

  2. If only one list displays in the dialog box, click Advanced Settings to show the Advanced pane.

  3. Create or select a Job Jackets structure.

  4. Select Rule Sets in the upper-right list.

  5. Click the New button to create a Rule Set. The Edit Rule Set dialog box displays.

    Use the Edit Rule Set dialog box to work with Rule Sets.
  6. Enter a name for the Rule Set in the Name field.

  7. Select the Rules you want in the Available list and click the button, or click Include All to add all of the Rules in the Available list to the active Rule Set.

  8. Click OK.

Applying a Rule Set to a layout

Once a Rule Set has been associated with a layout's Job Ticket template instance, the layout artist can evaluate the layout against that Rule Set (see "Evaluating a layout"). You can associate a Rule Set with a layout in two ways.

A job definer will typically add a Rule Set to a layout definition in a Job Jackets file before the actual project and layout are created. Because a Rule Set is a Resource, you add it to a layout definition just as you would any other Resource (see "Working with Resources: Advanced mode").

To make a Rule Set available in a layout as soon as that layout is created, associate the Rule Set with the layout definition using the Job Jackets Manager dialog box.

A layout artist can add a Rule Set to a layout after the project and layout are created. For information on how to do this, see "Working with Resources in a Job Ticket: Basic mode."

A layout artist can use the Edit Job Ticket dialog box (File > Job Jackets > Modify Job Ticket) to assign a Rule Set to a layout in the active project.

Evaluating a layout

Rule Sets, Layout Specifications, and Output Specifications provide tests that can be evaluated to determine whether a layout adheres to the specifications created by the job definer. The Evaluate Layout command lets you execute those tests and determine whether (and where) any violations occur. This command also checks the layout against its layout definition, to verify medium type (Print, Digital) and color management settings. Once violations are identified, a layout artist can decide what (if anything) to do about them.

Before you attempt to evaluate a layout, make sure the project is associated with a Job Ticket that defines Rule Sets or Output Specifications for the active layout.

The Evaluate Layout feature is designed to highlight layout problems and indicate where they can be fixed. However, it cannot prevent a layout artist from making changes that violate the specifications and Rules defined in a Job Ticket.

To evaluate a layout:

  1. Choose File > Job Jackets > Evaluate Layout. The Layout Evaluation dialog box displays, with applicable Rule Sets, Layout Specifications, and Output Specifications listed. To expand a Rule Set, Layout Specification, or Output Specification and see its component Rules, click the expander icon next to it.

    Use the Layout Evaluation dialog box to evaluate the active layout against Rule Sets, Layout Specifications, and Output Specifications.
  2. To edit the selected Rule, click its name and then click the Edit Rule button. Any changes to the Rule are written back to the Job Jackets file and apply to any other projects that use this Job Ticket.

  3. To indicate that a Rule should be checked, check the box next to that Rule. To indicate that all Rules in a Rule Set, Layout Specification, or Output Specification should be checked, check the box next to the name of the Rule Set, Layout Specification, or Output Specification.

  4. To evaluate the active layout against the checked Rules, click Evaluate. The Cases column is updated to show whether the document passes each Rule check.

  5. To view more detailed information about a violated Rule, click its name and then check the Instructions and Details boxes. The Instructions box shows any instructions written by the Rule creator, and the Details box provides information about the project (such as whether it has been modified since the last evaluation).

    The Layout Evaluation dialog box shows which Rules are passed and which Rules are violated.
  6. To scroll the layout to the locations where Rules are violated, click the Show Case buttons. This makes it easy to fix Rule violations.

You can configure QuarkXPress to automatically evaluate each layout when the project is opened, when the project is saved, when the project is closed, and when the layout is sent to output. For more information, see "Job Jackets preferences."

Job Jackets locking

To avoid having two people attempt to edit a Resource at the same time, QuarkXPress locks shared Job Jackets files under the following circumstances:

  • When the user of a project that shares a Job Jackets file displays the Edit Job Ticket dialog box (File > Job Jackets > Modify Job Ticket), QuarkXPress locks that Job Jackets file.

  • When a user displays the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu), QuarkXPress locks all Job Jackets files displayed in the Job Jackets Manager dialog box.

  • When the user of a project that shares a Job Jackets file creates, duplicates, edits, or deletes a Resource that is in the shared Job Jackets file, QuarkXPress locks the Job Jackets file. For example, if Tara is working in a project that shares the "Product List" Job Jackets file, and she chooses Edit > Colors and starts to modify a color that is in the project's Job Ticket, QuarkXPress locks all shared Resources in the "Product List" Job Jackets file so that only Tara can modify them.

When a Job Jackets file is locked:

  • You cannot create a project from a Job Ticket template in that Job Jackets file.

  • You cannot link a project to the Job Jackets file.

  • You cannot display the Edit Job Ticket dialog box (File > Job Jackets > Modify Job Ticket) for a project that shares the Job Jackets file.

  • You can display the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu), but you cannot edit the locked Job Jackets file or any of its Job Tickets.

  • You cannot edit a shared Resource in the Job Jackets file. For example, if Tara has locked the "Product List" Job Jackets file, and Samuel chooses Edit > Colors and tries to modify a color that is in the project's Job Ticket, the color is dimmed and unavailable until Tara unlocks the Job Jackets file.

  • You cannot add a layout or change the name of an existing layout in a project that shares the Job Jackets file.

  • You cannot edit a rule from the Layout Evaluation dialog box (File > Job Jackets > Evaluate Layout).

A locked Job Jackets file becomes unlocked at the following points:

  • When the user with the lock closes the Edit Job Ticket dialog box.

  • When the user with the lock closes the Job Jackets Manager dialog box.

  • When the user with the lock finishes editing a Resource that is in the shared Job Jackets file. Using the example above, this would be when Tara clicks Save or Cancel in the Colors dialog box after changing the shared color.

Because of Job Jackets locking, it is important to display Edit Job Ticket and the Job Jackets Manager dialog boxes only when necessary, and to close them as soon as you've completed any work you need to do with them.

If you display the Job Jackets Manager dialog box (Utilities menu) and find that you cannot edit the Job Jackets file associated with your project, that Job Jackets file is probably locked by another user.

Printing with JDF output

When you send a project to output, you can now indicate that a JDF file should be generated and stored wherever the output file is saved. (Note that if you are printing directly to the output device, no JDF file is generated.)

Use the JDF pane of the Print dialog box to specify that Job Jackets information be included at output in the form of a JDF-compliant XML file.