A Guide to QuarkXPress 2018

Boxes, lines, and tables

To create a successful page layout, you need an orderly way to arrange text and pictures — you need boxes. Boxes are items that can contain text or pictures; they can even be created to contain no content at all, perhaps to create colorful design elements on a page. Box boundaries give text and pictures a specific shape, size, and placement on a page.

Understanding items and content

QuarkXPress works on the concept of items (containers) and content (things that go inside of items).

Items are the building blocks of a page layout. The Item tool lets you do things like move, resize, rotate, reshape, cut, copy, and paste items.

The basic types of items are as follows:

  • Boxes, including text boxes, picture boxes, and no-content boxes. Boxes can come in a variety of shapes, such as rectangular, round, and Bézier.

  • Lines, including "plain" lines and text paths (which can include text). Lines, too, can be straight or Bézier.

  • Groups, which are sets of items that have been "glued" together so that they act like a single item.

  • Tables, which can contain both text and pictures.

Content is, basically, text and pictures. To create a layout, you will typically draw some text boxes and picture boxes, and then insert text and pictures into those boxes.

Because items and content are different, you use separate tools for manipulating each:

  • The Text Content tool lets you create rectangular text boxes and format text in text boxes or on text paths. You can also use the Text Content tool to cut, copy, and paste text.

  • The Picture Content tool lets you create rectangular picture boxes and manipulate pictures in picture boxes. You can also use the Picture Content tool to cut, copy, and paste pictures.

Understanding handles

The bounding boxes of selected text paths, lines, and boxes have small white squares called item handles. You can use these handles to resize and rotate a selected item.

Item handles

To resize an item, click and drag its item handles. To rotate an item, click and drag just outside one of the item's corner handles. The mouse pointer changes when you move it over or near a handle to indicate which action you can perform:

You can use item handles to resize or rotate an item.
Picture handles

When you select the Picture Content tool and click a picture box that contains a picture, the picture displays with large circles for handles. These handles are called picture content handles. When you click any part of the picture overlay, you can use the Move pointer to move the picture within its box.

Picture box displaying picture content handles

Picture content handles display even if the selected picture exceeds the size of its box (see illustration above). The picture displays beyond the box boundary. You can crop the image by resizing the picture box.

You can use picture content handles to resize or rotate a picture without changing the size or angle of its picture box.

  • Resize pointers:

  • Rotation pointers:

Rotated picture in an unrotated box

If you want to move a picture box or see what its crop looks like without the transparent overlay, press the Command/Ctrl key. This temporarily dismisses the overlay and allows you to interact with the box as if the Item tool were selected.

If you click and drag with the Picture Content tool when the mouse pointer is positioned over a spot where a picture box handle and picture content handle overlap, only the picture is resized or rotated. If you want to move the item handle, select the Item tool.

Understanding Bézier shapes

Before reshaping Bézier boxes and lines, make sure you understand the following definitions.

Point: A point connects line segments and defines where line segments start and end. Points connecting curved line segments have curve handles that control the shape of the curves. QuarkXPress offers three types of points: Corner, smooth, and symmetrical.

Corner point: A corner point connects two straight lines, a straight line and a curved line, or two noncontinuous curved lines. With curved lines, the corner point's curve handles can be manipulated independently, usually to form a sharp transition between the two segments:

Examples of corner points

Smooth point: A smooth point connects two curved lines to form a continuous curve. The curve handles always rest on a straight line through the point, but they can be distanced independently:

A smooth point

Symmetrical point: A symmetrical point connects two curved lines to form a continuous curve. The result is similar to a smooth point, but the curve handles are always equidistant from the point:

A symmetrical point

Curve handles: Curve handles extend from either side of a point and control a curve's shape:

Curve handles (upper left)

Line segments: Line segments are straight or curved line sections positioned between two points:

Line segments

When the Select Point tool is positioned over an active Bézier box or line, various pointers display indicating whether you can select a point, the curve handles, or a line segment. Click and drag using the pointers to reshape the Bézier box or line.

  • To change the shape entirely, choose a different option from the Item > Shape submenu.

  • To add a point to a Bézier box while working with the Bézier Pen tool , click a line segment. Alternatively, you can use the Add Point tool .

  • To remove a point from a Bézier box while working with the Bézier Pen tool , click the point. Alternatively, you can use the Remove Point tool .

  • To convert a point to another type of point while working with the Bézier Pen tool , Option+click/Alt+click the point. Alternatively, you can use the Convert Point tool .

  • To move a point or change the shape of a line segment while working with the Bézier Pen tool , Command+drag/Ctrl+drag the point or line segment.

  • To select curves or points so that you can move them or delete them, use the Select Point tool . Press Shift and click to select multiple points. Option+click/Alt+click a point to make it symmetrical.

To pan the layout while a Pen tool is selected, press Shift+Space and then click and drag.

Drop Shadows

With Drop Shadows, you can apply automatic feathered drop shadows to items and text in a layout.

To apply drop shadow effects to active items, use the Drop Shadow tab of the Measurements palette. The options are as follows:

  • Angle field: Enter a value between 180° and –180° in .001 increments to specify the angle of the "light source" causing the drop shadow.

  • Synchronize Angle check box: Check this to synchronize the angle with other drop shadows in the layout for which this feature is checked. Changing the Angle value of any drop shadows for which Synchronize Angle is checked will affect all of the drop shadows for which the box is checked.

  • Distance field: Enter an offset value for the item; the drop shadow offset is measured from the upper left corner of the item's bounding box.

  • Scale field: Enter a value from 0 to 1,000% to specify the size of the drop shadow in relation to the original item.

  • Blur field: Enter a value to specify how blurry the edges of the drop shadow are, with higher values creating fuzzier edges.

  • Skew field: Enter a value between –75° and 75° to slant the drop shadow at a certain angle.

  • Color, Shade, and Opacity: Choose a color from the drop-down menu and enter values in the fields to specify color, shade, and opacity of the drop shadow.

  • Multiply Drop Shadow: This setting controls how the shadow is combined with its background. When this box is checked, the shadow color is combined with the background color or colors using a "multiply" blending mode, producing a darker result (similar to an overprint). When this box is unchecked, the color of the background is combined with the color of the shadow to create the intermediate shades you see on screen. In general, this box should be checked when the shadow is black (regardless of shade or opacity) but unchecked when the shadow is a lighter color.

  • Inherit Item's Opacity: Check this to have the drop shadow reflect different opacities in the item, such as differences in the box background and border.

  • Item Knocks Out Drop Shadow: Check this to prevent a shadow from displaying through semi-opaque areas of an item — to keep a shadow from peeping through its box, for example.

  • Runaround Drop Shadow: Check this to include a drop shadow with the text wrap contour specified in the Runaround tab. The runaround Outset value is measured from the edges of the drop shadow. For example, if text is wrapping around a rectangular pull-out quote with a drop shadow, text will not overlap the drop shadow when Runaround Drop Shadow is checked.

To create text with a drop shadow, put the text in a box with a background of None, and apply the drop shadow to the box.

When you apply drop shadows to several non-grouped items, the items can cast shadows on each other if they overlap. When you apply a drop shadow to a group, however, the group as a whole casts a single shadow.

Item Find/Change

You can use the Item Find/Change palette (Edit > Item Find/Change) to perform find-change operations on text boxes, picture boxes, no-content boxes, lines, and text paths. You can find and change attributes including location, shape, color, opacity, border style, picture scale, number of columns, and more.

The Item Find/Change palette

Item Find/Change does not support tables.

The Item Find/Change palette works as follows:

  • Tabs across the top display the type of attributes you can search for: Box, Box Color, Border, Line, Picture, Text, and Drop Shadow.

  • Each pane contains two sides: Find What and Change To. You check the attributes you're searching for on the Find What side, and then check those attributes you want to change on the Change To side of the palette. You can search on attributes in multiple panes at the same time.

  • The palette menu lets you put the selected item's attributes into the Find What side of the palette. You can specify options in all the panes in the Item Find/Change palette by choosing Acquire All Attributes or complete one pane at a time by choosing Acquire Panel Attributes. You can use Clear All Attributes and Clear Panel Attributes to clear panes.

  • The Summary pane summarizes the settings in all of the panes.

  • The check boxes at the bottom of the palette let you restrict your search to specific types of items. To find and replace all types of items, leave all of these boxes are unchecked.

  • When you click Find Next, Item Find/Change searches the entire layout from start to finish. To limit a search to the active spread, Option/Alt+click the Find Next button.

Working with boxes

There are three types of boxes: Text boxes, picture boxes, and no-content boxes (boxes with a content of None). All three box types can contain color, shades, blends, and borders. When you draw a text box, picture box, or no-content box, the available controls correspond to the box type you create. But you can import text into picture boxes that contain pictures, and you can import pictures into text boxes that contain text. In addition to changing content type, you can change the shape and other attributes of a box.

Creating text and picture boxes

There are three ways to create boxes:

  • To create a no-content box (a box that can be changed into a picture box or a text box), click and drag with the Rectangle Box tool , the Oval Box tool , or the Starburst tool . You can declare text content by pressing T as you draw a no-content box. You can declare picture content by pressing R as you draw a no-content box.

  • To create a rectangular text or picture box, click and drag with the Text Content tool or Picture Content tool .

  • To create a Bézier box, use the Bézier pen tool . For more information, see "Creating Bézier boxes."

To constrain rectangular boxes to squares and oval boxes to circles, press Shift while you drag.

You can create boxes with the following tools:

To change a no-content box into a text box, press Command+E/Ctrl+E and import a text file.

To change a no-content box into a picture box, press Command+E/Ctrl+E and import a picture file.

You can change the corner type of rectangular boxes to rounded, concave, and beveled corners using the Item > Shape submenu or the Box Corner Style drop-down menu in the Measurements palette. You can add and alter rounded corners by entering values in the Box Corner Radius field in the Home tab of the Measurements palette. Any attributes you apply to one box (borders, colors etc.) can be copied and applied to any other existing box using the Item Form Painter tool on the Tool palette. see "Copying attributes from one box to another."

Creating Bézier boxes

The Bézier Pen tool lets you draw multi-sided Bézier boxes and lines that can have straight and curved line segments (see "Understanding Bézier shapes").

For another way to make uniquely shaped boxes, see "ShapeMaker."

To draw a Bézier box:

  1. Select the Bézier Pen tool from the Tools palette. Move the Crosshair pointer to any position on the page and click to establish the first point.

  2. Move the pointer to where you want the next point positioned. To constrain pointer movement to a 45-degree angle relative to the page, press Shift.

  3. Click to create points and line segments.

    • Clicking a point without dragging creates a straight line and corner point. To create a curved line segment and smooth point, click and drag wherever you want the next point positioned. A point with two curve handles displays. You can control the curve's size and shape by dragging a curve handle. Press Option/Alt while dragging a smooth point to create a curved segment and corner point.

  4. If desired, edit the Bézier shape while you are still drawing it.

    • To add a point to an existing segment of the shape, click the line segment where you want the point to be.

    • To delete a point from the active shape while you are drawing it, click the point.

  5. To close the box, close the path by positioning the mouse pointer over the beginning of the line and then click when the Close Box pointer displays.

    When any of the drawing tools are active, you can press Command/Ctrl to temporarily switch to the Select Point tool. When the Select Point tool is active, you can press Command+Option/Ctrl+Alt to temporarily switch to the Item tool.

    You can join, extend or close existing open paths. For more information see "Joining, extending and closing open paths".

Resizing boxes

You can resize any box by modifying the size of its bounding box. A bounding box is a nonprinting, rectangular shape that encloses every box. The box's item handles demarcate the bounding box. The best way to view the bounding box clearly is to use the Item tool to select item handles on a Bézier box.

You can resize active boxes using any of the following methods:

  • Select the Item tool or a Content tool and move the mouse pointer over a selected box's item handle to display the Resizing pointer. Click and drag the handle to a new location to reduce or enlarge the box. Press Shift to maintain the box's aspect ratio. Press Option/Alt to resize the box from the center. Press Command/Ctrl to resize the box contents along with the box.

  • Enter values in the W and H fields of the Home or Space/Align tabs of the Measurements palette to change the width and height, and then press Return/Enter.

    Use keyboard increments to automatically increase/decrease the value in this field. See "Palettes" for more information.

You can lock a box's proportions, so that you don't have to press Shift to maintain the aspect ratio. For more information, see "Locking box proportions."

Locking box and picture proportions

To lock the selected box's proportions, display the Home tab of the Measurements palette and click the proportion lock control next to the W and H fields. If this control is locked, QuarkXPress maintains the item's aspect ratio during resizing operations.

The proportion lock controls in the unlocked (top) and locked (bottom) states

To lock the proportions of the picture in the selected box, display the Home tab of the Measurements palette and click the proportion lock control next to the X% and Y% fields. If this control is locked, QuarkXPress maintains the picture's aspect ratio during resizing operations.

To use the proportion-locking feature with the Item Find/Change feature, display the Box or Picture tab of the Item Find/Change palette (Edit menu), then check or uncheck Proportions in the Find What or Change To area.

To use the proportion-locking feature with item styles, display the Box or Picture tab of the Edit Item Style dialog box (Edit > Item Styles) and check Proportions.

Reshaping boxes

You can change the shape of a box in three ways:

  • You can change the shape entirely by choosing a different option from the Item > Shape submenu.

  • You can use the Box Corner Radius field in the Home or Space/Align tab of the Measurements palette. Enter the value manually or place the cursor in the fields and use the up/down arrow keys to automatically increase/decrease the value. Using th Shift/Alt key in conjunction with the up/down arrow keys changes the amount the value is increased/decreased. See the chart in "Palettes."

  • You can reshape Bézier boxes by repositioning points, curve handles, and line segments. For more information, see "Understanding Bézier shapes."

Adding borders to boxes

Borders are decorative that can be placed around any type of box. To access border controls for active boxes, display the Border  tab of the Measurements palette.

 Use the controls in these tabs to specify a border style, width, color, and opacity. If the border style contains gaps, you can also specify gap color and opacity.

When using the Border tab of the Measurements palette, you can choose to apply the same border to all sides of the box, or different boders to each side. Check  Multiple Borders to apply different borders to all sides of the box. Select the top, bottom, right, or left box frame icons to apply a border to one or more sections of the box at a time. 

Use Line Drawing Order to choose the drawing order for the borders (Vertical/Horizontal on Top).

You can only apply different border styles to different sides of a rectangular text box. This feature is not available for picture boxes or text boxes of any other shape.

You can also create your own border styles in the Dashes and Stripes dialog box (Edit menu) and specify border settings in an Item Style. For more about Item Styles, see "Item Styles XTensions software."

Applying colors to boxes

To apply a background color to active boxes, do one of the following: 

  • Display the Colors palette (Window > Colors), click the Background Color button , and then use the controls in the palette.

  • Use the controls in the Home tab of the Measurements palette.

The controls available are as follows:

  • Box or Background Color: Lets you specify the background color for the box.

  • Shade: Lets you specify the tint of the background color (0% = white, 100% = full color).

  • Opacity: Lets you control the transparency of the box background (0% = fully transparent, 100% = fully opaque).

You can also specify box color in an Item Style. For more about Item Styles, see "Item Styles XTensions software."

Applying gradients to boxes

A gradient is a gradual transition from one color to another. To apply a gradient to the background of active boxes, see Creating gradients".

Specifying number of columns in text boxes

To specify the number of columns in a text box,

use the Cols field and the Gutter field in the Home tab and the Text tab of the Measurements palette to specify how many columns the text box should have and how wide their gutters should be.

The Line Between option available in the Text tab allows you to specify that a line will be drawn between columns in a multi-column text box and and its height will be equivalent to the height of the text in the column.

You can control how text will flow in relation to the columns. See "Controlling column flow."

Merging and splitting boxes

Options in the Merge or Split Paths submenu (Item menu) let you create complex Bézier boxes from existing boxes. For example, if a rectangular box overlaps an oval box, you can select the submenu and choose an option that will create a single box with the same content. If you merge two picture boxes, one picture will display in the combined box. If you merge two text boxes, the text from one of the boxes will be deleted.

To merge two or more text boxes and preserve the text, see "Merging text boxes.

 

To use the Merge or Split Paths feature, select two items and then choose one of the following options from the Merge or Split Paths submenu:

  • The Intersection command retains any areas where items overlap the back item, and removes the rest.

  • The Union command combines all the items into one box, retaining all overlapped areas as well as non-overlapped areas.

  • The Difference command deletes the front items. Any overlapping areas will be cut out.

  • The Reverse Difference command deletes the back item. Any overlapping areas will be cut out.

  • The Exclusive Or command leaves all of the shapes intact but cuts out any areas where there is overlap. If you want to edit the points surrounding the cut-out area, you will notice that there are now two points at every location where two lines originally crossed.

  • The Combine command is similar to the Exclusive Or command, but if you look at the points surrounding the cut-out area, you will notice that no points were added where two lines intersect.

  • The Split command either splits a merged box into separate boxes, splits a complex box that contains paths within paths into separate boxes, or splits a box that contains a border that crosses over itself (such as a figure eight). To use this feature, select two items and then choose one of the following options from the Merge or Split Paths submenu.

  • The Outside Paths command works with a merged box that contains several, non-overlapping shapes. Outside Paths keeps all the outside path information and divides non-overlapping outside paths into separate boxes.

  • The All Paths command creates separate boxes out of every shape within a complex box.

Merging text boxes

To merge two or more text boxes, preserving the text:

  1. Select the text boxes you want to merge.

  2. Choose Item > Merge Text Boxes and choose one of the following from the sub menu:

    • Top Down - to merge the text in the boxes in the order they appear on the layout (Left-to-Right and then Top-to-Bottom).

    • Selection Order - to merge the text in the boxes in the order that you selected the boxes.

  3. The text in the boxes is merged and contained in a single box.

    The size of the resulting text box is dependant on the bounding box of the area selected. Use Item > Fit Box to Text to size the new box to fit the text it contains.

This option is disabled if any of the selected boxes is a linked text box, a locked text box or a bézier text path. Boxes with an associated callout marker and grouped text boxes cannot be merged with any text boxes.

Adding text and pictures to boxes

To add text to a box, choose the Text Content tool , double-click the box, and then either start typing, paste text copied from elsewhere, or choose File > Import.

To place a picture in a box, select the box with the Picture Content tool and then either paste a picture copied from elsewhere or choose File > Import.

Changing box type

To convert a selected box to a different type, choose Picture, Text, or None from the Content submenu (Item menu). However, you can also change a text box to a picture box by choosing File > Import and selecting a picture. You can change a picture box to a text box by choosing File > Import and selecting a text file.

To convert a selected text box to a text path, choose a line shape from the Item > Shape submenu.

When you select a Box tool, you can use the following modifier keys to create text or picture boxes:

  • Press T as you draw to create a text box.

  • Press R as you draw to create a picture box.

Creating a box from a clipping path

If a picture box has an associated clipping path (embedded or automatically created), you can create a new box that has the shape of that clipping path by selecting the picture box and choosing Item > New Box From Clipping.

Copying attributes from one box to another

To copy all of the attributes applied to a box and apply them to a different box:

  1. Select the Item Format Painter tool on the Tool palette.

  2. Select the box whose attributes you want to copy to "fill" the eyedropper .

    To add other attributes to the tool, hold down the Shift key as you select the box. The following dialog displays:

    Make any changes you want to the box attributes and click OK. The new attributes are added to the Item Form Painter tool, but are not applied to the selected box.

  3. Select any other box to apply the copied attributes.

The Item Format Painter works across all layouts in the same project, allowing you to copy attributes from one item to another on the same layout, or to an item on a different layout.

The eyedropper will retain these attributes until you select another item tool or a blank space on the canvas, allowing you to select as many boxes as you wish and apply these attributes over and over.

If a box has alreay been selected before you select the Item Format Painter tool , then step 3 is not necessary, as soon as you perform step 2, the copied attributes will automatically be applied to this selected box.

Super Step and Repeat

You can use Super Step and Repeat to transform items as you duplicate them by scaling, rotating, and skewing the items.

Using Super Step and Repeat

Use Super Step and Repeat to quickly and easily duplicate items while rotating, scaling, or skewing them. To use Super Step and Repeat:

  1. Select a picture box, text box, text path, or line.

    • To specify the number of times you want the item to be duplicated, enter a number from 1 to 100 in the Repeat Count field.

    • To specify the horizontal placement of copies relative to the original item, enter a value in the Horizontal Offset field. A negative value places copies to the left of the original; a positive value places copies to the right of it.

    • To specify the vertical placement of copies relative to the original item, enter a value in the Vertical Offset field. A negative value places copies above the original; a positive value places copies below it.

    • To rotate each duplicated item, specify the rotation value for each item in degrees in the Angle field. For example, if you enter 10, the first duplicated item will be rotated 10 degrees from the original item; the second duplicated item will be rotated 20 degrees from the original item; and so on. The rotation is counterclockwise from the original item.

    • To specify the thickness of either the final duplicated frame (for a picture box or text box), or the final duplicated line (for a text path or line), enter a point value in the End Frame/Line Width or End Line Width field.

    • When duplicating a box or a line, enter a value from 0% to 100% in the End Box Shade or End Line Shade field to specify the background color shade in the final duplicated box or the line color shade of the final duplicated text path or line.

    • When duplicating a box that has a blended background, the End Box Shade 2 field is enabled. Enter a value from 0% to 100% in the End Box Shade 2 field to specify the second background shade for the blend in the final duplicated box.

    • To specify the scale of the final duplicated picture box, text box, text path, or line, enter a value from 1% to 1000% in the End Item Scale or End Line Scale field.

    • To skew a duplicated box, enter a value from 75° to –75° in the End Item Skew field to specify the skew or slant of the final duplicated box.

    • To scale the contents of a picture box, text box, or text path scaled to fit the duplicate boxes, check Scale Contents.

    • To specify the point around which rotation or scaling will take place for the item, choose an option from the Rotate & Scale Relative To drop-down menu. Note that Selected Point is available as a choice in the Rotate & Scale Relative To drop-down menu only when a point on a Bezier item is selected.

  2. Click OK.

ShapeMaker

With ShapeMaker, you can create a wide variety of intricate shapes. You can create new shapes from scratch, or apply new shapes to existing boxes.

To display the ShapeMaker dialog box, choose Utilities > ShapeMaker.

The ShapeMaker dialog box provides tabs that let you create various types of shapes. All of the tabs have the following controls:

  • Item: Lets you choose whether you want to create a text box, picture box, no-content box, text path, or rule path.

  • Width and Height: Lets you specify the width and height of the box or path. If you have an item or items selected when you choose Utilities > ShapeMaker, these values are filled in automatically to match the selected item or items.

  • Columns and Gutters: When Text Box is selected from the Item menu, you can use these fields to specify how many columns the text box should have and how wide their gutters should be.

  • Lines and Spacing: When Text Path is selected from the Item menu, you can use these fields to specify how many lines to create and how far apart they are. (If a box is selected and Lines is set to zero, the application will create as many paths as are necessary to fill the area described by that box.)

  • Alter Current Box: If a box is selected when you choose Utilities > ShapeMaker, the application updates the shape of that box instead of creating a new item.

The controls in the tabs are described in the topics below.

 

ShapeMaker Waves tab

The Waves tab of the ShapeMaker dialog box (Utilities > ShapeMaker) lets you create boxes with wavy sides. To use this tab, describe the waves you want to use in the Wave 1 and Wave 2 areas, then assign them to the four sides of the box using the controls in the top part of the tab.

Waves tab of ShapeMaker dialog box

Specify the settings for the wave:

  • Top, Left, Bottom, and Right: These controls let you configure the four sides of the box. You can choose Wave 1, Wave 2, or Flat.

  • Keep waves parallel: Keeps the waves on either side of the box parallel with one another.

  • The controls in the Wave 1 and Wave 2 areas let you choose which type of wave to use, the frequency of the wave, the phase (starting point) of the wave, and the amplitude (depth) of the wave.

Once you have defined the attributes, you can click the Add Preset button to save this shape.

To revert to the default shape, click the Reset button, .

To delete a predefined shape, hold down the Alt/Option key while selecting it from the list.

ShapeMaker Polygons tab

The Polygons tab of the ShapeMaker dialog box (Utilities > ShapeMaker) lets you create polygonal boxes.

Polygons tab of ShapeMaker dialog box

Specify the settings for the polygon:

  • Type: Choose what type of polygon go create from the drop-down menu. The controls immediately under this drop-down menu change depending on what type of polygon is selected.

    • Regular polygons: Lets you specify how many sides the polygon has.

    • Stars: In addition to specifying how many sides the polygon has, you can specify the radius of the space inside the spikes and superimpose a secondary star at a different size.

    • Polygrams: Similar to Stars, but instead of specifying a radius, you can control the way the sides line up with each other with the Point Skip field.

    • Spirograms: Similar to Polygrams, but creates only an outline.

    • Random polygons: Lets you create polygons with randomized sides

    • Golden rectangle: Lets you create a polygon with the golden ratio (approximately 1:1.618).

    • Double square: Lets you create a polygon in the shape of two adjacent squares.

  • Edges: Lets you control whether the edges of the box are flat or curved. If you choose an option other than Flat, you can indicate the curvature of the sides with the Curvature controls. If you choose one of the Swirl options, you can indicate the direction of the swirl with the Orientation controls.

  • Randomize Points: Lets you control the degree of randomness in the shape, from 0 (none) to 100 (maximum).

  • New Random: Applies some randomness to the shape.

Once you have defined the attributes, you can click the Add Preset button to save this shape.

To revert to the default shape, click the Reset button, .

To delete a predefined shape, hold down the Alt/Option key while selecting it from the list.

ShapeMaker Spirals tab

The Spirals tab of the ShapeMaker dialog box (Utilities > ShapeMaker) lets you create spiral shapes.

Spirals tab of ShapeMaker dialog box

Specify the settings for the spiral:

  • Type: Choose what type of spiral too create from the drop-down menu.

    • Archimedes: an evenly spaced circular spiral.

    • Golden Spiral: a spiral built with the golden ratio.

    • Custom: this makes the Winds field available, so you can control how many times the spiral goes around.

  • Rate: Lets you control how quickly the width of the spiral increases.

  • Segments: Lets you control how circular the spiral is allowing you to specify the number of segments per wind.

  • Smoothness: Lets you control how smooth the spiral is. You can get a harder-edged shape by lowering the Segments value and decreasing the Smoothness value.

  • Clockwise and Counterclockwise: Lets you control the direction of the spiral.

Once you have defined the attributes, you can click the Add Preset button to save this shape.

To revert to the default shape, click the Reset button, .

To delete a predefined shape, hold down the Alt/Option key while selecting it from the list.

ShapeMaker Rectangles tab

The Rectangles tab of the ShapeMaker dialog box (Utilities > ShapeMaker) lets you create rectangular boxes with customized corners.

Rectangles tab of ShapeMaker dialog box

Specify the settings for the rectangle:

  • Check Same for all to configure all four corners of the shape with a single set of controls. To separately configure each corner of the box uncheck Same for all.

  • Use the drop-down menus to specify a corner type (Normal, Rounded, Beveled, Concave, Pointed, or Inset) and a diameter (for options that involve a diameter).

  • Curvature: Controls how curved the corners are if you select an option that includes curvature.

  • Balance: For some options, lets you control whether the corners lean toward the sides of the box or toward the top.

  • Radial: For some options, lets you control whether the corners of the box are aligned with the center of the box or not.

Once you have defined the attributes, you can click the Add Preset button to save this shape.

To revert to the default shape, click the Reset button, .

To delete a predefined shape, hold down the Alt/Option key while selecting it from the list.

Working with lines

There are two types of lines: Straight and Bézier lines. You can apply colors and line styles to any type of line.

Creating lines

To create a line, first select the Line tool from the Tools palette and move the Crosshair pointer to any position on the page. Click and drag to draw the line.

You can constrain a line to 0, 45, or 90 degrees by pressing Shift while you draw it.

You can also create orthogonal lines using the Orthogonal Line tool .

Any attributes you apply to one line (size, shape, appearance etc.) can be copied and applied to any other existing line using the Item Form Painter tool on the Tool palette. see "Copying attributes from one line to another."

Creating Bézier lines

The Bézier Pen tool lets you draw multi sided Bézier boxes and lines that can have straight and curved line segments (see "Understanding Bézier shapes").

To draw a Bézier line:

  1. Select the Bézier Pen tool from the Tools palette. Move the Crosshair pointer to any position on the page and click to establish the first point.

  2. Move the pointer to where you want the next point positioned. To constrain pointer movement to a 45-degree angle relative to the page, press Shift.

  3. Click to create a point and line segments.

    • To make a curved line segment, click and drag wherever you want the next point positioned. A point with two curve handles displays. You can control the curve's size and shape by dragging a curve handle.

    • To make a corner point, press Option/Alt before you click. If you click and hold, you can control the radius of the corner point by dragging a curve handle.

    • To add a point to an existing segment of the shape, click the line segment where you want the point to be.

    • To delete a point from the active shape while you are drawing it, click the point.

  4. To finish the line, double-click.

    When any of the drawing tools are active, you can press Command/Ctrl to temporarily switch to the Select Point tool. When the Select Point tool is active, you can press Command+Option/Ctrl+Alt to temporarily switch to the Item tool.

Line modes for orthogonal lines

There are four line modes: Endpoints, Left Point, Midpoint, and Right Point. Depending on the mode you choose in the Measurements palette (Home or Space/Align tabs), line length and position will be described differently.

  • Endpoints mode: The X1 field indicates the horizontal position of the first end-point; the Y1 field indicates the vertical position of the first end-point. The X2 field indicates the horizontal position of the last end-point; the Y2 field indicates the vertical position of the last end-point.

  • Left Point mode: The X1 field indicates the horizontal position of the leftmost end-point; the Y1 field indicates the vertical position of the leftmost end-point.

  • Midpoint mode: The XC field indicates the horizontal position of the midpoint of the line; the YC field indicates the vertical position of the midpoint of the line.

  • Right Point mode: The X2 field indicates the horizontal position of the rightmost end-point; the Y2 field indicates the vertical position of the rightmost end-point.

Resizing lines

You can resize active straight lines using any of the following methods:

  • Select the Item tool and move the Arrow pointer ove an item handle to display the Resizing pointer. Click and drag the handle to a new location to reduce or extend the length of the line.

  • Choose either Left Point, Midpoint, or Right Point from the Line Mode drop-down menu in the Home or Space/Align tab of the Measurements palette to display the L (Length) field. To precisely change the length of a line, enter a value in the L field, then press Return/Enter.

You can resize any Bézier line by modifying the size of its bounding box. To do so, make sure Item > Edit > Shape is unchecked, and then resize the line as if it were a box.

Reshaping lines

You can change the shape of a line in the following ways:

  • You can change the shape entirely by choosing a different option from the Item > Shape submenu.

  • You can reshape Bézier lines by repositioning points, curve handles, and line segments. For more information, see "Understanding Bézier shapes."

To pan the layout while a Pen tool is selected, press Shift+Space and then click and drag.

Controlling line appearance

To control the appearance of active lines, use the controls in the following places:

  • Home tab of the Measurements palette

  • Colors palette (Window menu) — for line color only

In addition to color, shade, and opacity, you can control the following characteristics for lines:

  • Line style: This option lets you control the general appearance of a line. Several line styles are included by default, and you can add new ones with the Dashes & Stripes dialog box (Edit menu).

  • Width: You can specify the width of lines in any measurement system. You can also specify a Hairline width; the printed width of a hairline rule is .125 pt on a PostScript imagesetter, with a wider value on some laser printers.

  • Arrowheads: You can apply arrowheads to lines using the Arrowheads drop-down menu.

You can also specify line appearance in an Item Style. For more about Item Styles, see "Item Styles XTensions software."

Joining lines

You can merge two lines into one by selecting the Item tool , selecting the lines, and choosing Item > Merge > Join Endpoints. The Join Endpoints command is available when the endpoints of lines or text paths are within six points of each other.

Joining, extending and closing open paths

You can click an endpoint of an existing shape and it selects that point and goes into regular draw mode, so the next click adds a new point and a segment to the selected line. You can add as many segments as you need.

Double-click and endpoint to finish the line as an open path.

Click an opposite endpoint to close the path (just like during the original draw operation).

While drawing, if you click the endpoint of another open path then the path being drawn and the path just clicked become joined. Using these techniques together, you can begin to extend one path, and end up joining it with another.

Copying attributes from one line to another

To copy all of the attributes applied to a line to a different line:

  1. Select the Item Format Painter tool on the Tool palette.

  2. Select the line whose attributes you want to copy to "fill" the eyedropper .

    To add other attributes to the tool, hold down the Shift key as you select the line. The following dialog displays:

    Make any changes you want to the line attributes and click OK. The new attributes are added to the Item Form Painter tool, but are not applied to the selected line

  3. Select any other line to apply the copied attributes.

The Item Format Painter works across all layouts in the same project, allowing you to copy attributes from one item to another on the same layout, or to an item on a different layout.

The eyedropper will retain these attributes until you select another item tool or a blank space on the canvas, allowing you to select as many lines as you wish and apply these attributes over and over.

If a line has alreay been selected before you select the Item Format Painter tool , then step 3 is not necessary, as soon as you perform step 2, the copied attributes will automatically be applied to this selected line.

Manipulating items

Items can be cut and then pasted in new locations, locked so they cannot move, duplicated once or many times, stacked to create unusual visual effects, and manipulated in other ways.

Selecting items

To manipulate items, you must first select them. Once selected, most kinds of items display outlines and handles for reshaping.

To select an item, first select the Item tool , the Text Content tool , or the Picture Content tool and move the Arrow pointer over an item. Click once to select a single item or Shift+click individual items to select more than one item at a time. You can also select multiple items by selecting the Item tool and drawing around an area that contains the items.

If you double-click an empty picture box with the Picture Content tool selected, the Import dialog box displays. If the picture box contains a picture, the Picture Content tool is selected and the Edit Original dialog box displays .

To deselect an active item, click outside it. When the Item tool is selected, you can press Tab to deselect any active items.

Moving items

You can move items by: 

  • Entering values in the X and Y fields on the Home tab in the Measurements palette.

    Use keyboard increments to automatically increase/decrease the value in this field. See "Palettes" for more information.

  • Manually moving items using the Item tool . If you hold down the mouse before moving a box or text path, you can see the contents as you move the item. You can also "nudge" items by selecting the Item tool and pressing an arrow key on your keyboard.

The box's item handles demarcate the bounding box. The best way to view the bounding box clearly is to use the Item tool to select item handles on a Bézier box.

Cutting, copying, and pasting items

When the Item tool is selected, the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands (Edit menu) are available for active boxes, lines, and text paths. Choose Edit > Paste (Command+V/Ctrl+V) to place a copy of the items contained on the Clipboard in the center of the project window.

When the Item tool is selected, you can remove items with the Delete command. Deleted items are not copied to the Clipboard.

Controlling the stacking order of items

When two or more items overlap, each is either positioned in front of or behind the other item. The term "stacking order" refers to the front-to-back relationship of the various items on a page. Each item you create occupies its own level in the stacking order. Every new item you create becomes the front item.

The Item menu includes commands that let you control item stacking order.

  • Choose Item > Send to Back to move an item to the back of the page or layer.

  • Choose Item > Bring to Front to move an item to the front of the page or layer.

  • To move an item one level backward in the page or layer choose Item > Send Backward.

  • To move an item one level forward in the page or layer choose Item > Bring Forward.

In a document with layers, the layers themselves are in a particular stacking order; within each layer, each item has its own relationship to the stacking order. When you use the Send to Back, Send Backward, Bring to Front, and Bring Forward commands (Item menu), the stacking order of the items is altered within the layer.

To activate an item that is hidden behind other items, select the Item tool and press Command+Option+Shift/Ctrl+Alt+Shift while you click repeatedly at the point where multiple items overlap. Pressing Command+Option+Shift/Ctrl+Alt+Shift while clicking will successively activate items from the front of the stacking order to the back.

Grouping items

You can combine multiple items on a page or spread into a single group. Grouping items is useful when you want to select or move several items simultaneously. You can move, cut, copy, duplicate, and perform a number of other functions on a group. For example, you can group all the items that compose a publication masthead; once grouped, you can modify or move the entire group as you would a single box, line, or text path.

After you create a group, you can still edit, resize, and reposition individual items while maintaining the group relationship. You can also place a copy of a group into an open QuarkXPress library for use in other documents.

Items can be grouped when two or more items (lines, boxes, text paths, or other groups) are active. To select multiple items with the Item tool , either Shift+click each item or draw a marquee around the items you want to group. Choose Item > Group (Command+G/Ctrl+G) to place multiple selected items into a single group.

You can group groups, and multiple-select a group (or groups) along with individual boxes, lines, and text paths to create a larger group.

With the Item tool selected, you can move, cut, copy, paste, duplicate, rotate, and color a group. With the Text Content tool or Picture Content tool selected, you can manipulate individual items as you would any ungrouped item.

To move an item within a group, press Command/Ctrl and select the item with the Item tool , the Text Content tool , or the Picture Content tool .

The active fields in the Measurement palette tabs will affect the active group.

Choose Item > Ungroup (Command+U/Ctrl+U) to ungroup a single group, or Item > Ungroup All to ungroup every group in a group that contains other groups.

Resizing grouped items

To resize every item in a group simultaneously, click and drag the group's item handles. If you press Command+Shift/Ctrl+Shift while resizing a group, all frame widths, line weights, pictures, and text are resized proportionally. If you press Command/Ctrl while resizing a group, frame widths, pictures, and text are still resized, but not proportionally.

Duplicating items

QuarkXPress lets you make single or multiple copies of boxes, lines, and text paths.

Create a single copy of a selected item using the Duplicate command (Item menu). You can also press Option/Alt while dragging an item or group to create a duplicate.

The Super Step and Repeat feature is useful for laying out design elements that contain a number of evenly spaced copies of an item. Create multiple copies of an item and specify the distance between them using the Super Step and Repeat command (Item menu).

For another way to make uniquely shaped boxes, see "ShapeMaker XTensions software."

Spacing and aligning items

You can control the position of multiple selected items relative to one another using the Item > Space/Align submenu or the Space/Align tab of the Measurements palette.

You can choose from among eight spacing and six alignment options in the Measurements palette, and you can specify alignment relative to selected items, the page, or (for Print layouts with facing pages) the spread. The Item > Space/Align submenu includes the "Item relative" and "Page relative" modes described below. The Measurements palette also includes a third mode called "Spread relative."

The space/align modes are as follows:

  • Item relative mode positions items relative to the uppermost active item, which does not move. The uppermost item is determined by the location of the item's top edges. If two or more items have the same top edges, then items are spaced from the leftmost item.

  • Page relative mode positions items relative to the page edges (left, right, top, or bottom).

  • Spread relative mode is available for active Print layouts that include facing pages. Assume that you have opened a layout with a spread and then selected an item on a left page and another item on the right page. If you then click the Spread relative mode icon in the Measurements palette and choose Space horizontal centers , the selected items position themselves on the far-left and far-right sides of the spread.

Rotating items

To rotate active items, do one of the following:

  • Select the Item tool and move the mouse over a corner handle. When the Rotation pointer displays, click to establish a rotation point; then drag in a circular motion to rotate the item. The Arrowhead pointer and the item's position will display as you drag. If you press the Shift key when rotating, movements are constrained to 45-degree angles.

  • Enter a value in the field on the Measurements palette (Home and Space/Align tabs) and press Return/Enter.

    Use keyboard increments to automatically increase/decrease the value in this field. See "Palettes" for more information.

To rotate a straight line, choose either Left Point, Midpoint, or Right Point from the Mode drop-down menu (Measurements palette) to display the Angle field.

Skewing items

To skew active items within bounding boxes, enter a value in the Box Skew field on the Home tab of the Measurement palette.

Positive values slant items to the right; negative values slant them to the left.

Use keyboard increments to automatically increase/decrease the value in this field. See "Palettes" for more information.

Locking and unlocking items

Locking lets you protect items and content from accidental changes. You can do the following:

  • To prevent an item's size and position from being changed (and to prevent the item from being deleted), check Item > Lock > Position.

  • To prevent an item's contents from being edited, check Item > Lock > Story or Item > Lock > Picture.

To unlock selected items, uncheck the appropriate option in the Item > Lock submenu.

Anchoring items and groups in text

You can anchor an item or group so that it flows as a character within text. To anchor an item or group within text, use the Item tool to select the item or group you want to anchor and choose Edit > Copy (Command+C/Ctrl+C) or Edit > Cut (Command+X/Ctrl+X). Then, with the Text Content tool selected, place the text insertion point at the point in text where you want to anchor the item or group and choose Edit > Paste (Command+V/Ctrl+V).

QuarkXPress also provides support for nested anchors (i.e an anchored item can contain a further anchored item to the nth level).

Working with callouts

The Callouts feature lets you create floating boxes that always display on the same page or spread as the content they pertain to. For example:

  • You can create figures with pictures and text that follow their references from page to page.

  • You can create pull quotes that can automatically move to a different page with their source text.

  • You can create "floating" icons that sit in the space to the left of a paragraph to indicate that the paragraph is a tip, a note, a warning, and so forth.

For more information, see the topics below.

Understanding callouts

A callout is a floating box that always displays on the same page or spread as the content it pertains to. Each callout is anchored to a particular spot in a text story called a callout anchor. A callout anchor flows along with text like a character. When a callout anchor moves to a new page or spread, the callout moves with it. When guides are displayed, a line links each callout anchor with its associated callout (if any).

A callout anchor with its associated callout

A callout's position in a layout is based on two things:

  • The location of its callout anchor. A callout is always on the same page or spread as its callout anchor.

  • The callout anchor's settings. You can position a callout relative to the spread, the page, the box or cell that contains the callout anchor, the paragraph that contains the callout anchor, or the callout anchor itself.

For example, you can configure a callout so that its horizontal location is always against the outside margin, but its vertical location is always aligned with the paragraph that contains its callout anchor. The settings for such a configuration look like this:

Settings for a callout with a fixed horizontal location and a variable vertical location

It is important to note that the settings for a callout are stored with its callout anchor, not with the callout itself

You can control the positioning of a callout by configuring its callout anchor directly, or by applying a callout style to the callout anchor. A callout style is a named package of callout settings that displays in a palette. Callout styles are useful in documents where you use different callout settings over and over; rather than recreating those settings each time, you can simply select the callout anchor and click the appropriate callout style in the Callout Styles palette.

Callout Styles palette

You can think of callout styles as similar to style sheets (for more information, see "Working with style sheets"). Like style sheets and other resources, callout styles can be managed with Job Jackets (for more information, see "Job Jackets").

A callout anchor can be selected or unselected. When a callout anchor is selected, it has a red outline and its callout style (if any) is selected in the Callout Styles palette.

A selected callout anchor (left) and an unselected callout anchor (right)

When guides are turned off, you can see only the selected callout anchor.

When you cut or copy and paste text that contains a callout anchor that has an associated callout, the callout is cut or copied and pasted along with the text.

Creating a callout

To create a callout:

  1. Select the Text Content tool and place the text cursor at the point in the text where you want the callout anchor to be.

  2. Choose Item > Callout Anchor > Insert Callout Anchor. A callout anchor is inserted and automatically selected.

  3. Select the item or group that you want to make into a callout.

  4. Choose Item > Callout Anchor > Associate with Callout Anchor. The item or group becomes a callout, and a line displays between the callout and the callout anchor.

  5. Configure the callout anchor. There are two ways to configure a callout anchor:

    • To apply a callout style to the callout anchor, display the Callout Styles palette (Window menu) and click the name of the callout style, or choose Item > Callout Anchor > Callout Styles > [Callout Style Name]. For more information, see "Working with callout styles."

    • To edit the settings of the callout anchor directly, choose Item > Callout Anchor > Edit Callout Settings. If a callout style has been applied to the callout anchor, any changes you make will override the callout style's settings.

For information on how to configure a callout anchor or callout style, see "Configuring a callout anchor."

Configuring a callout anchor

The process of configuring a callout anchor is essentially the same whether you are configuring a callout style or directly configuring a callout anchor.

To configure a callout anchor:

  1. Select the callout anchor and choose Item > Callout Anchor > Edit Callout Settings. The Edit Callout Settings dialog box displays.

  2. To control how the callout aligns horizontally, use the controls in the Align callout horizontally relative to area. (The Offset field lets you adjust the horizontal positioning of the callout from where it would otherwise be.)

    If you choose Spread from the Align callout horizontally relative to drop-down menu and specify a horizontal offset, that offset is inverted on left-facing pages. This allows you, for example, to configure a callout to always be .25" inside of the inside margin; on a right-facing page, such an offset moves the callout to the right, but on a left-facing page the offset must move the callout to the left.

  3. To control how the callout aligns vertically, use the controls in the Align callout vertically relative to area. (The Offset field lets you adjust the vertical positioning of the callout from where it would otherwise be.)

  4. To allow the callout to be manually repositioned, check Allow manual positioning of callout. If you subsequently move the callout, the values in the Offset fields will be automatically updated to reflect the new position of the callout.

    To prevent the callout from being manually repositioned, leave this box unchecked.

  5. To prevent the callout from extending beyond the page margins, check Keep within margins.

  6. Click OK.

Working with callout styles

Callout styles make it easy for you to apply often-used settings to callout anchors. To create, edit, duplicate, or delete callout styles, use the Callout Styles dialog box (Edit > Callout Styles). You can also use this dialog box to append callout styles from other projects.

Callout Styles dialog box

You can edit the Default callout style, but you cannot delete it.

Callouts and runaround

If a callout with runaround causes its callout anchor to move, this can lead to an error state. For example, if a callout's runaround pushes its callout anchor to the next page, the callout moves to the next page — which allows the callout anchor to return to the previous page, which causes the callout to return to the previous page, and so on.

When QuarkXPress detects this kind of a situation, the following things happen:

  1. The callout switches to the settings defined in the Default callout style. An icon displays next to the callout style's name in the Callout Styles palette when the callout anchor is selected.

  2. If the error condition still occurs, QuarkXPress applies the No Style settings to the callout and it is positioned at its last valid location.

  3. If the application cannot find a valid location, it turns runaround off for the callout. When QuarkXPress turns off a callout's runaround this way, it also places this visual indicator on the callout:

To view visual indicators, check View > Visual Indicators.

To turn runaround back on for such a callout, use the drop-down menu in the Runaround tab of the Measurements palette.

Working with tables

In QuarkXPress, a table is a distinct item, like a text box, picture box, text path, or line. When working with tables, you can pretty much think of a cell as an individual picture box, text box, or no-content box, and you can handle cells in much the same way you handle these other items. To work with elements of the table itself — such as rows and columns — use the Table menu.

Drawing a table

To draw a table and specify its properties, do the following:

  1. Select the Tables tool from the Tool palette, drag to draw a rectangle that is roughly the size of the final table, and then release the mouse button. The Table Properties dialog box displays.

    The Table Properties dialog box
  2. Specify the number of horizontal rows in the Rows field, and specify the number of vertical columns in the Columns field.

  3. To specify the default cell type, click Text Cells or Picture Cells in the Cell Type area. Later, you can select specific cells and convert the content type if needed.

  4. If you want to create text cells that expand as you add text, use the controls in the Auto Fit area.

  5. If you have a preference for how to navigate through cells in a table when you press Tab, you can choose a different option from the Tab Order drop-down menu.

  6. If you want to link text cells so imported text flows through the specified cells — similar to linked text boxes — check Link Cells. If you check Link Cells, you can choose the order in which to link the text cells from the Link Order drop-down menu.

    If you do not link cells in this manner, you can link them later using the Linking tool or the Link Text Cells command (Table menu). In addition, even if you don't link the text cells, you can still use Tab to jump from cell to cell while entering or editing data.

  7. If you intend to import data from Excel, check Link to External Data. For more information, see "Importing Excel tables."

  8. If you want the table to remain the same size if you add or delete rows, check Maintain Geometry.

  9. To specify the story direction for table cells, click Horizontal or Vertical in the Story Direction area.

  10. To specify the table orientation, click Horizontal or Vertical in the Table Direction area.

  11. Click OK.

Converting text to tables

The success of converting text to a table depends on the text preparation itself. It's important that paragraphs, tabs, spaces, or commas (the characters QuarkXPress can convert) are used consistently in a text block, because these characters are used in the table conversion to define rows and columns. It's common for users to use multiple tab characters in a word processor to align columns of data — rather than setting appropriate tab stops. If the text block you are converting has such multiple tab characters, the text block probably has an inconsistent number of tabs between columns of data. You will need to make the tab characters consistent before you convert the text to a table.

To convert text to a table:

  1. Using the Text Content tool , select all the text you want to convert to a table.

  2. Choose Table > Convert Text to Table to display the Convert Text to Table dialog box. Based on the selected text, QuarkXPress guesses what to Separate Rows With, what to Separate Columns With, and how many Rows and Columns are necessary for the worst-case scenarios in the selected text.

    The Convert Text to Table dialog box
  3. If you want to create text cells that expand as you add text, use the controls in the Auto Fit area.

  4. If you want the information in the table to flow differently — for example, if the values are currently in descending order but would have more impact in ascending order — you can change the flow. Choose an option from the Cell Fill Order drop-down menu (the default is Left to Right, Top Down).

  5. Click OK. A new table is created, offset from the original text box.

Importing Excel tables

Table data often originates in a spreadsheet program such as Excel, and you can import table data just as you import pictures. Although the technique is slightly different, the results are the same: The table in QuarkXPress is linked to the Excel file for tracking and updating.

You can import only .xlsx files in QuarkXPress.

If you import a table from Excel using the Link to External Table feature in the Table Properties dialog box, table usage will be tracked just as picture usage is tracked. This ensures that you're notified if the source table changes, and that you have the latest table data when you output the layout, whether you print, collect for output, or save as a PDF. To check the status of a table, choose Utilities > Usage, and then click the Tables tab.

Although you can update tables just as you can update pictures, you'll need to keep the following points in mind:

  • If you check Include Formats in the Table Link dialog box when you first import an Excel table, the table's Excel formatting is preserved (as much as possible) in QuarkXPress. If you later update the table, any local formatting you have applied in QuarkXPress is removed and replaced with the formatting from the Excel file.

  • If you do not check Include Formats in the Table Link dialog box when you first import an Excel table, the table's Excel formatting is discarded. If you later update the table, QuarkXPress attempts to preserve any local formatting you have applied to the table in QuarkXPress.

To import an Excel table and maintain the link in QuarkXPress:

  1. Using the Tables tool, drag to draw a table of approximately the dimensions you need. The Table Properties dialog box displays when you release the mouse button.

  2. Check Link to External Data.

  3. Click OK to display the Table Link dialog box.

    The Table Link dialog box
  4. Click Browse to locate and select an Excel file to import.

  5. If the file includes multiple worksheets, choose the one you want to import from the Sheet drop-down menu. If you want to import only a portion of the data, you can specify a cell range in the Range field or choose a named range from the drop-down menu.

  6. In the Options area, check the attributes you want to import.

  7. Click OK.

Formulas and references are not imported. Instead, the final values that result from formulas and references are imported. Inserted pictures are not imported. Text with Auto Filter or Advance Filter (Data > Filter) applied is imported as static text.

A quicker way to create a table from Excel data — without linking the source table to the QuarkXPress project for updates — is to copy and paste. To do this, select any portion of data in an Excel worksheet and copy the selected data. Then simply switch to QuarkXPress and choose Edit > Paste. QuarkXPress creates a table appropriate to the data and inserts the text.

Importing Excel charts

If you have charts or pictures created using Insert > Chart or Insert > Picture in Excel that you want to use in a QuarkXPress layout, you can import those charts or pictures the same way you import other pictures. To do this, use the Insert Chart tab of the Import Picture dialog box (File menu). Charts and pictures imported from Excel are tracked by the Pictures tab of the Usage dialog box (Utilities menu) just like other pictures.

Inline tables

Excel tables can be imported and inserted inline with text.

The advantages of inline tables over the designer tables are:

  • Inline Tables are much faster when creating large tables that span multiple pages.

  • Table styles can only be applied to Inline Tables.

Inserting an inline table

To import an Excel table and insert it inline with text:

  1. Place the cursor in the text where you want the table to be.

  2. Choose Item > Insert Inline Table. The Table Link dialog box displays.

    The Table Link dialog box
  3. Click Browse to locate and select an Excel file to import.

  4. If the file includes multiple worksheets, choose the one you want to import from the Sheet drop-down menu. If you want to import only a portion of the data, you can specify a cell range in the Range field or choose a named range from the drop-down menu.

  5. In the Options area, check the attributes you want to import.

  6. Indicate how many header rows you would like to include in the Header Rows field.

  7. Optionally you can choose a table style to apply to the imported table from the Table Style drop-down menu. For more information, see "Table styles."

  8. Click OK.

Table styles

To edit table styles, choose Window > Table Styles to display the Table Styles palette. The buttons at the top of this palette let you add, edit and duplicate table styles. Choose an existing table style and click the button, or click the button to add a new table style.

The Edit Table Style dialog displays.

  • In the Name field, enter a name for the table style, or the application will use a default "New Table Style" name.

  • Specify the table attributes you want the new table style to have.

When you're done, click OK.

After you have added a table style, it is listed in the Table Styles palette (Window > Table Styles). The new style will be available when you attempt to insert an inline table.

Adding text and pictures to tables

When working with tables, think of a table cell as a text box or a picture box. Each box contains content — text that may or may not be linked to the next cell, an individual picture, or nothing (maybe just a gradient). Therefore, you can add content to tables much as you add content to boxes — by typing text, importing text, or importing pictures.

Converting text cells to picture cells is the same as converting a text box to a picture box. Select all the cells you want to convert and choose Item > Content > Picture.

Editing table text

Two important things to know about editing text within tables are how to navigate between cells and how to select text for formatting. As always when working with text, you must first select the Text Content tool .

Navigating through a table works as follows:

  • Click in a cell in which you want to enter or import text.

  • Press Tab to move to the next cell.

  • Press Shift+Tab to go back to the previous cell.

  • Press the arrow keys to move through the text in a cell, and to move from cell to cell.

To enter a tab character in a text cell, press Control+Tab. To enter a right-indent tab, press Option+Tab/Control+Shift+Tab. If you need to align numbers within a table on the decimal point or other character, you can insert tabs in each table cell and then specify the appropriate Align On tab stops (Style > Tabs).

Selecting text in rows and columns works as follows:

  • To select all the text in a row, click outside the right or left edge of the table.

  • To select all the text in a column, click outside the top or bottom edge of the table.

  • To select all the text over several rows or columns, drag along an edge of the table.

  • To select text in non-adjacent rows or columns, Shift+click the specific rows or columns.

  • To select text in various rows and columns, use the options in the Select submenu of the Table menu. Options include Cell, Row, Odd Rows, Even Rows, Column, Odd Columns, Even Columns, All Cells, Header Rows, Footer Rows, and Body Rows. The Select commands in the Table menu are helpful for applying different formatting to alternating rows or columns.

Linking table cells

When cells are linked, text that is typed, imported, or pasted into a cell fills the first text cell in the linked story, and then flows into each subsequent linked cell. As with text in linked boxes, the Next Column character (enter on the numeric keypad) is helpful for controlling text flow in linked cells. In addition to linking table cells to each other, you can link cells to and from text boxes and text paths.

  • To link all the cells in a table, check Link Cells in the Table Properties dialog box when you create the table.

  • To link selected cells in a table, choose Table > Link Text Cells. All but the first cell in the selection must be empty.

  • To manually link table cells, use the Linking tool . As with linking text boxes, click to select the starting cell and then click the next cell you want to add. To redirect existing links, Shift+click with the Linking tool.

  • To unlink table cells, use the Unlinking tool to click the blunt end of the arrow between linked cells.

  • To link table cells to text boxes or text paths, use the Linking tool .

If you combine linked text cells (Table > Combine Cells), the combined cells are removed from the text chain; the remaining links are unaffected. If a combined cell is split (Table > Split Cell), the links are maintained and text flows according to the specified Link Order.

Formatting tables

The Table tab in the Measurements palette is available when a content tool is selected, otherwise the options are available in the Home tab.

Formatting gridlines

Gridlines are the horizontal lines between rows and the vertical lines between columns. When gridlines are selected, you can use the Home and Table tabs of the Measurements palette to specify line style, width, color, gap color, shades, and opacities.

  1. To format gridlines, first select them as follows:

    • For an individual gridline, click the gridline with the Text Content tool .

    • For multiple gridlines, Shift+click each gridline.

    • For the entire table, all horizontal gridlines, or all vertical gridlines, select the table with the Item tool .

    • Choose an option from the Select submenu of the Table menu: Horizontal Grids, Vertical Grids, Border, or All Grids.

  2. Once the appropriate gridlines are selected, go to the Home or Table tab in the Measurements palette..

    The Table tab of the Measurements palette.
  3. On the Home tab and the Table tab, there is a section for formatting the selected gridlines.

Inserting and deleting rows and columns

You can insert rows and columns anywhere within a table. Simply click in a cell that is immediately above or below where you want to add a row. Or, click in a cell to the right or left of where you want to add a column. Then, choose Table > Insert > Row or Table > Insert > Column.

To select rows or columns to delete, drag the arrow pointer over a table edge and then Shift+click the arrow pointer, or use the commands in the Select submenu of the Table menu (such as Odd Rows). Then, choose Table > Delete > Row or Table > Delete > Column.

If Maintain Geometry is checked in the Table menu and you delete a column or row, existing columns or rows increase in size to fill the space of the deleted columns or rows. If Maintain Geometry is unchecked, the table becomes smaller as necessary.

Combining cells

To combine cells, Shift+click a rectangular selection of cells with the Text Content tool . Choose Table > Combine Cells. To revert combined cells to match the surrounding table, select the combined cells and then choose Table > Split Cells.

If you combine unlinked cells containing text or pictures, the content of the upper-left cell in the selection is maintained for the combined cell.

Manually resizing tables, rows, and columns

As with other items in QuarkXPress, you can drag to resize rows, columns, and tables. To resize a row or column, click a gridline to display the resize pointer. Drag the pointer up or down to resize a row and left or right to resize a column. To resize an entire table, press one of the following keyboard commands while you drag a resize handle.

Effect on table

Mac OS X command

Windows command

Table and contents resized

Command

Ctrl

Table (but not contents) resized proportionally

Shift

Shift

Table and contents resized proportionally

Command+Shift

Ctrl+Shift

Converting tables back to text

If you need to export the current data from a table — for example, to save the data as a Word file — you can convert the information to text. To do so, select the table and then choose Table > Convert Table > To Text.

Working with tables and groups

For flexibility, you can group tables to other items using the Group command (Item menu). In addition, you can disassemble a table by converting its cells to a series of grouped text boxes, picture boxes, or both. This method lets you separate elements of a table and use those elements elsewhere in a layout. To do this, select a table and choose Table > Convert Table > To Group. To work with the individual boxes, choose Item > Ungroup.

Continuing tables in other locations

Because tables do not always fit on one page or spread — or within the space allotted in a design — tables can be automatically continued to other locations anywhere in a layout.

There are two ways to continue tables:

  • Anchoring the table in a text box. This is the preferred way to break a table in most situations, because it is easiest to use

  • Breaking the table manually. This method is necessary when you break a table horizontally (for example, if you want to put the first five columns of a table on one page and the remaining three columns on a different page).

When tables are continued, you may still need a legend to explain what's in the table. You can add a legend in the form of automatically created and synchronized header and footer rows, and you can create special "continued" table headers for portions of a table after the first.

Anchoring tables in text

One way to continue a table in another location is to anchor the table in a text box. An anchored table flows with the text like any other anchored object, but it also breaks automatically if it is too long to fit in the box and it is the only thing in the paragraph that contains it.

To anchor a table in text:

  1. Create the table.

  2. Select the table with the Item tool .

  3. Choose Edit > Cut.

  4. Select the Text Content tool and place the text insertion point where you want the table to be.

  5. Choose Edit > Paste.

    At this point, the table will break automatically as it flows through the text. However, it will not have a header unless you add it. For more information, see "Adding header and footer rows to tables."

Breaking a table manually

One way to continue a table in another location is to specify a table break. The table break is the maximum size the table can reach before it splits into two linked tables. In continued tables, any changes to a table, such as inserted columns, are reflected throughout the table. To manually create a continued instance of a table:

  1. Choose Table > Table Break to display the Table Break Properties dialog box.

    The Table Break Properties dialog box
  2. Check Width to break the table when its width exceeds the value in the field. By default, the current width of the table displays in the Width field — decreasing this value will break the table.

  3. Check Height to break the table when its height exceeds the value in the field. By default, the current height of the table displays in the Height field — decreasing this value will break the table.

  4. You can specify the number of header rows by entering a value in the Header Rows field. (For more information, see "Adding header and footer rows to tables.")

  5. If the table has a header, you can check Continued Header to create a different version of the header that displays in continued instances of a table. For example, if the header on the first portion of the table is "List of Contributors," the continued header might be "List of Contributors (continued)." Click First Header Row to limit the continued header to the first header row, or All Header Rows to create continued headers from all header rows.

    To set the continued header's contents, close this dialog box, then go to a portion of the table after the first and change the header contents there.

  6. You can specify the number of footer rows by entering a value in the Footer Rows field.

  7. Click OK. If the height or width of the table meets the Table Break criteria, the table separates into two or more linked tables. You can move the continued tables to other locations in the layout. The table may break later as you adjust it by resizing or adding rows and columns.

    A broken table with a continued header

    The Table Break feature works in both directions: it continues the table using additional sub-tables as necessary if the table gets larger and recombines tables as necessary if the table gets smaller.

    To sever the links between continued tables, select any instance of the continued table and choose Table > Make Separate Tables.

Adding header and footer rows to tables

You can specify that header and footer rows repeat automatically in continued instances of tables. Even better, header and footer rows are automatically synchronized, so any changes in the text are reflected throughout all instances of a continued table.

In this continued table, the first two rows — the table heading and the column heads — repeat as header rows in the continued instances of the table. The first row is a continued header.

To add header and footer rows to a table:

  1. Set up the table to break. For more information, see "Breaking a table manually" and "Anchoring tables in text."

  2. There are two ways to create header and footer rows:

    • To create an automatic header, select the first one or more rows of the table and choose Table > Repeat As Header. To create an automatic footer, select the last one or more rows of the table and choose Table > Repeat As Footer.

    • Choose Table > Table Break. The Table Break Options dialog box displays. To set the number of header and footer rows, enter values in the Header Rows and Footer Rows fields, respectively.

    Table Break Properties dialog box for anchored table

    To create a secondary header that displays in portions of a table after the first, check Continued Header. For example, if the header on the first portion of the table is "List of Contributors," the continued header might be "List of Contributors (continued)." Click First Header Row to limit the continued header to the first header row, or All Header Rows to create continued headers from all header rows.

    When you're finished, click OK.

  3. To set a continued header or footer's contents, go to a portion of the table after the first and change the header contents there.

You can uncheck Repeat as Header or Repeat as Footer in the Table menu any time to remove the header or footer rows from continued tables.

Once you add automatic header rows and footer rows, the remaining table rows are considered "body rows." Options in the Select submenu of the Table menu let you select all the Header Rows, Footer Rows, and Body Rows in any instance of a continued table for formatting.

Table Import

You can import a table into QuarkXPress using a Microsoft Excel (.xlsx) file as the data source, and you can update that same QuarkXPress table when the data changes in the Excel file. You can also import and update charts and pictures from Microsoft Excel and tables from MS Word.

The Table Import functionality provides the following user interface elements:

  • The Link to external data check box is added to the Table Properties dialog box.

  • The Tables tab is added to the Usage dialog box.

  • The Insert Chart tab is added to the Import Picture dialog box and displays all the charts present in the workbook.